Monday, May 14, 2012

102 London System Repertoire: Kings Indian

Welcome again to Main Line Monday. Each Monday morning I plan to present a piece of a repertoire covering about 100 positions at a time in a wide variety of chess openings. The main line is the London System. Here are the London System King's Indian lines. Black usually employs, in some convenient order, the set-up Nf6 g6 Bg7 0-0 d6 and plays for e5 or c5. Below is a repertoire I actually used in preparing for a recent tournament.

About 20 years ago Andy Soltis wrote a book on the London System were I am listed as a Research Assistant. In his book Soltis covers the standard 1.d4 2.Nf3 3.Bf4 4.e3 5.h3 vs the King's Indian to deal with the ...Nf6-Nh5 threat. Other authors have tried to show that White has nothing to fear from that and can take time to play 5.Be2 prior to h3. I have followed the 5.Be2 idea in my repertoire.

[Event "London System"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.05.14"]
[Round "?"]
[White "102 London"]
[Black "1.d4 Nf6 Kings Indian"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "D02"]
[Annotator "Sawyer,Timothy E"]
[PlyCount "23"]
[SourceDate "2012.01.29"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bf4 Bg7 (3... Nh5 4. Bg5) (3... d6 4. e3 Nh5 (4... Bg7
5. h3) 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 g5 7. Nfd2 Ng7 8. Bg3 Nf5 9. Bd3 Bg7 10. Qf3) 4. e3 O-O
(4... d5 5. Be2 O-O (5... c6 6. c3) 6. O-O c5 (6... c6 7. h3 Nbd7 8. c3 Re8 9.
Nbd2) 7. c3 Nc6 8. h3) (4... Nh5 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 g5 7. Nfd2) (4... d6 5. h3 b6
6. Be2 Bb7 7. O-O Nbd7 8. c3 Nd5 (8... O-O 9. Nbd2) 9. Bg3) 5. Be2 d6 (5... c5
6. c3 b6 7. h3 Bb7 8. Nbd2 d6 9. O-O) (5... Nh5 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bh4 g5 8. Nfd2
gxh4 9. Bxh5) 6. h3 Nbd7 (6... c5 7. c3 Qb6 (7... b6 8. Nbd2 Bb7 (8... Nbd7 9.
O-O) 9. O-O Nc6 (9... Nbd7 10. Bh2) 10. Bh2 cxd4 11. exd4) (7... Be6 8. dxc5
dxc5 9. Qxd8 Rxd8 10. Nbd2) (7... a6 8. O-O b5 9. a4) (7... Nc6 8. O-O cxd4 9.
exd4) 8. Qb3 Be6 9. Qxb6 axb6 10. a3 Nc6 11. Nbd2 Na5 12. O-O) (6... b6 7. O-O
Bb7 8. Nbd2 Nbd7 9. Bh2 c5 10. c3) (6... Nc6 7. O-O Nh5 (7... Qe8 8. Bh2) 8.
Bh2 f5 9. c3) (6... Nfd7 7. O-O Nc6 8. Bh2 e5 9. c3 f5 10. b4) (6... c6 7. O-O
Nbd7 8. c4) 7. O-O c5 (7... Qe8 8. c4 e5 9. Bh2 Qe7 (9... c6 10. Nc3 Qe7 11. b4
) (9... Ne4 10. Nbd2 Nxd2 11. Qxd2 e4 12. Ne1) 10. Nc3 c6 (10... e4 11. Nd2 Re8
12. b4) (10... Re8 11. b4) 11. b4 Ne8 12. Rc1) (7... b6 8. c3 Bb7 (8... c5 9.
Nbd2) 9. Nbd2 Qe8 10. a4) (7... c6 8. c4 Re8 9. Nc3 Qa5 (9... a6 10. a4) (9...
e5 10. dxe5 dxe5 11. Nxe5) (9... Qb6 10. Qc2) 10. a3) (7... Re8 8. c4) (7...
Ne4 8. Nbd2 Nxd2 9. Qxd2 e5 10. Bh2) (7... e6 8. c4) 8. c3 b6 (8... a6 9. a4 b6
10. Nbd2 Bb7 11. Bh2) 9. Nbd2 Bb7 (9... a6 10. a4) 10. Bh2 Ne4 (10... Qc7 11.
a4 a6 12. Qb3) (10... Rc8 11. a4 a6 12. Re1) (10... a6 11. a4 Ra7 12. Re1) (
10... Re8 11. a4 a6 12. Qb1) 11. Nxe4 Bxe4 12. a4 *


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Sicilian (1.e4 c5)
Copyright 2015 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com

2 comments:

  1. So many side variations, I can hardly keep up with regular moves.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, this can be confusing. However, it is designed to provide the most likely 100 positions you would face in this opening if you play the White pieces. The simple approach is to learn the main line which is 12 moves deep. Add others as you meet them in practice. A grandmaster would know a lot more lines, but this is enough for most players.

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