Monday, September 30, 2013

Index: Blackmar-Diemer Ryder 6.Be3 Qg4

This index below shows the critical line of the Blackmar-Diemer Ryder Gambit. Black as the defender grabs the second gambit pawn and plays 6.Be3 Qg4 offering a queen swap while up two pawns. This is considered to be Black strongest attempt to refute the BDG Ryder. White has three common tries to work up an attack as illustrated below.

1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Qxf3 Qxd4 6.Be3 Qg4
7.Nb5 Qxf3
     7...Na6
7.0-0-0 e5
       7...Qxf3 8.Nxf3 Bg4 9.Nb5 Bxf3
                                           9...Na6
7.Qf2 a6
     7...c6
     7...e6
     7...Nc6
     7...Ne4 8.Nxe4 Qxe4 9.0-0-0
                                      9.Bd3
     7...e5 8.Be2
              8.a3 Nc6
                 8...Bd6 9.Nf3 Qf5 10.Bd3
                                            10.0-0-0
Last revised June 28, 2014

You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Sunday, September 29, 2013

George Dunn Meets Albin Counter

Most of the time during the 1989 USCF Golden Knights Postal Chess Tournament with its various rounds over the next four years I defended vs 1.d4 with 1...f5, the Dutch Defence. Here in one of the later rounds vs George Dunn when I was likely out of the running for any prizes I ventured an Albin Counter Gambit. The obvious danger in playing a gambit in correspondence chess in the days before databases and strong chess engines was that your opponent could just pick up a book and look up the refutation. The recommended move was 5.g3 back then, but there was minimal analysis. Today 5.a3 is popular among authors. After a sharp fight where we both had chances, a drawish position was reached.

Dunn - Sawyer, corr USCF 1992 begins 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 d4 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.g3 Be6 6.Nbd2 Qd7 7.Bg2 0-0-0 [Or 7...Nge7 8.0-0 Ng6 9.Qa4+/=] 8.0-0 h5 9.Qb3 h4 10.Nxh4 Bh3 11.Ndf3 [11.Be4!?+/=] 11...Be7 12.Bg5 Bxg2 13.Nxg2 Bxg5 14.Nxg5 Nxe5 15.f4 f6 16.fxe5 fxg5 17.Qd3 [17.Ne1=] 17...Ne7 [17...Nh6=/+] 18.Rf2 Qe6 19.Ne1 Qxe5 20.Nc2 Nc6 21.Qf5+ Qxf5 22.Rxf5 d3 23.exd3 Rxd3 24.Raf1 Nd4? [24...g6=] 25.Nxd4 Rxd4 26.Rxg5 Rd2 27.Rxg7 [27.h4+/-] 27...Rdxh2 28.Rff7? [28.Rg8+ Rxg8 29.Kxh2+/-] 28...Rxb2 29.Rxc7+ Kb8 30.a4 Rd8 31.Rcd7 1/2-1/2


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Sicilian (1.e4 c5)
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Saturday, September 28, 2013

Lagland vs Roos in Critical BDG Ryder

Tired of all these Blackmar-Diemer Gambit Ryder games this month? Well, this is the last actual game I have planned for the BDG Ryder. This is in advance of the final Index on this variation. The players are well-known BDGers Goran M. Lagland and Beppo Roos.

Lagland - Roos, corr BDG/E11, 1965 begins 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Qxf3 Qxd4 6.Be3 Qg4 7.Qf2 e5 8.a3 Bd6 9.Nf3 [Another idea is 9.h3 Qf5 10.Qd2 Nc6 11.g4 Qe6 12.0-0-0 0-0 13.Nf3 Qe7-/+] 9...Qf5! 10.Bd3? [This just loses a piece with no compensation. White might try 10.h3 e4 11.Nd2 Qxf2+ 12.Kxf2 Be5-/+; or 10.0-0-0!? e4 11.Bb5+ Nbd7-/+] 10...e4 11.Nxe4 Nxe4 12.Qh4 Qa5+ 13.b4 [If 13.Kf1 Nf6 14.Bd4 Be7-+] 13...Bxb4+ 14.Kf1 Nd2+ 15.Nxd2 Bxd2 16.Qe4+ Be6 17.Bxd2 Qxd2 18.Qxb7 Qf4+ 19.Ke1 0-0 20.Qxa8 Re8 0-1


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Friday, September 27, 2013

Index: Blackmar-Diemer Ryder 5.Qxf3 Qxd4

This index below shows Blackmar-Diemer Ryder Gambit games where the defender grabs the second gambit pawn. White's pieces can quickly jump to life and overwhelm the Black defences. These games are tricky, trappy and short. Black's quick threats against the White king usually do not amount to much, but White's attacks often lead to mate! Better for Black is the critical line linked here: 6.Be3 Qg4.

1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Qxf3 Qxd4
6.Nb5
6.Bd2
6.Bd3
6.Bf4 e5 7.Nb5
              7.Nge2
6.Be3 Qh4+
     6...Qd6
     6...Qe5 7.0-0-0 Bg4 8.Qxb7 Bxd1
                                          8...Qxe3+ 9.Kb1
                                                          9.Rd2
     6...Qd8 7.Nh3
                 7.Rd1 Nbd7
                      7...Bd7 8.Bc4
                                  8.Qxb7
6.Be3 Qb4 7.Rb1                                 
6.Be3 Qb4 7.0-0-0 and now:
7...e5 8.Nb5
7...c6 8.Qf2                                         
7...Nc6 8.Nb5
7...Bg4 8.Nb5 and now:
8...Bxf3 9.Nxc7#
8...Nbd7 9.Qxb7
8...Na6 9.Qxb7 Rc8
                   9...Rb8 (a) - 9...Rb8 (b)
                   9...Qe4
Last revised June 28, 2014

You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Thursday, September 26, 2013

Gegner vs Weber: White Wins BDG Ryder

As I work on completing my Blackmar-Diemer Gambit Ryder Indexes, I am adding a few extra games to round out my coverage more completely in the critical line. Here is a contest with the BDG Ryder 6.Be3 Qg4 variation between Jurgen Gegner and G. Weber. In this line White meets 7...e5 with 8.a3, obtains a good game and wins in postal chess.

Gegner - Weber, corr, 1980 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Qxf3 Qxd4 6.Be3 Qg4 7.Qf2 e5 8.a3 Nc6 9.Nf3 Bd7 [More common is 9...Bd6 10.0-0-0 e4-/+] 10.h3 Qh5 11.0-0-0 Be7 12.g4 [12.Bb5+/=] 12...Bxg4 13.hxg4 Qxh1 14.Nxe5 0-0 15.Bg2 Nxg4? [15...Qxd1+! 16.Nxd1 Nxe5-/+] 16.Nxg4 Qh5 17.Bf3 Qh4 18.Qg2 Bg5 19.Rh1 Bxe3+ 20.Nxe3 Qf6 21.Be4 h6 22.Ncd5 [22.Nf5! Kh8 23.Qd2 Rfd8 24.Qe3+-] 22...Qg5 23.Bh7+ Kh8 24.Qxg5 hxg5 25.Nf5 Rae8 26.b4 a6 27.a4 b5 28.Nxc7 Re5 29.Nxa6 bxa4 30.b5 Ne7 [30...Rxb5 31.Bg6+ Kg8 32.Ne7+ Nxe7 33.Bh7+ Kh8 34.Bd3+ Kg8 35.Bxb5+/=] 31.Nd4 Rd8 32.c3?! [32.Nf3! Rxb5 33.Bd3+ Kg8 34.Bxb5+- wins] 32...g6 33.Bxg6+ Kg7 34.Bc2 a3 35.b6 Rxd4 [35...a2! 36.Kb2 Ra5 37.Nc7 Rh8 38.Re1 a1Q+ 39.Rxa1 Rxa1 40.Kxa1 Rb8=] 36.cxd4 Ra5 37.b7 Nc6 38.b8Q [38.d5! a2 39.Kb2 Rb5+ 40.Bb3+-] 38...Nxb8 39.Nxb8 a2 40.Kb2 Rb5+ 41.Kxa2 Rxb8 42.d5 Kf6 43.Re1 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Index: Blackmar-Diemer Ryder 5.Qxf3 Nc6

Now that I have published more then 1000 posts, I am setting up an Index for each major opening variation. Thus we can find posts for specific variations by moves and not just by name. This is the fourth of six planned indexes on the Blackmar-Diemer Ryder Gambit. Most indexes will be published on Mondays, but the ones on the Ryder are all written, so I might as well post another. Here Black declines the gambit by attacking d4 a second time with 5...Nc6. In practice this is very popular among club and blitz players. White naturally pins the knight with 6.Bb5 with a double attack on c6. Any index can be updated at any time by adding new games. Am I missing a post in a key line? Send me your game!

This variation begins 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Qxf3 Nc6:
6.Bb5 Bg4 7.Bxc6+ bxc6 8.Qxc6+ Bd7 9.Qb7 Qc8
                                                                  9...e6
     6...Bd7 7.Be3 a6
                      7...Nb4 8.Bxd7+ Qxd7 9.Qxb7
                                                         9.0-0-0
                      7...e5 8.dxe5
                                8.0-0-0
                      7...e6 8.Nge2
                               8.0-0-0 Bb4
                                     8...Be7 9.g4
                                                 9.d5
                  7.Nge2 Nb4
                         7...Bg4
                         7...e5
                         7...g6
                         7...a6 8.Bd3
                                   8.Bc4
                                   8.Ba4 h6
                                        8...b5
Last revised June 28, 2014

You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
Copyright 2015 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Craig Jones French Alapin Gambit Accepted

Craig Jones is one of the few players that I played in postal chess and over-the-board in USCF. At the time he was one of Pennsylvania's best masters. Master Craig Jones is not to be confused with contemporary Master Curt Jones of Tennessee, whom I also played.

Here Craig Jones handles my French Defence Alapin Gambit 5.f3 exf3 by defending better than I attack. Most of the time Black develops a bishop on move six. Craig Jones instead played for a quick central counter attack with 6...Nbd7 and 7...c5. This variation has to be considered a critical line for the 3.Be3 Alapin-Diemer French.

Sawyer (2070) - Jones (2061), corr USCF 89NS20, 02.11.1990 begins 1.d4 d5 2.e4 e6 3.Be3 dxe4 4.Nd2 Nf6 5.f3 exf3 6.Ngxf3 Nbd7 [ More common is a bishop move, such as 6...Be7.] 7.Bd3 c5 8.c3 [In light of what follows, this seems to close. Maybe 8.0-0 or 8.Qe2.] 8...Be7 9.Qe2 0-0 10.0-0 b6 11.Bg5 Bb7 12.Qe1?! [This is too slow. 12.Rad1 cxd4 13.Nxd4 Nc5 14.Bc2 Nd5 15.Bxe7 Qxe7=/+] 12...cxd4 13.cxd4 h6 14.Qh4 Re8 15.Rae1? [15.Bf4 Nd5 16.Qg3 Nxf4 17.Qxf4 Rc8-/+] 15...hxg5 16.Nxg5 Nf8 17.Rxf6? [Or 17.Ndf3 Bxf3 18.Rxf3 Ne4 19.Rh3 Qxd4+ 20.Ree3 Qxe3+ 21.Rxe3 Nxg5-+ and for the sacrificed queen Black has two knights, a rook and a pawn.] 17...Bxf6 0-1


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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