Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Zilbermints vs Bonin in BDG

IM Jay Bonin faced the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit at the Nassau Chess Club Blitz event on August 29, 2016. Lev Zilbermints won the game with the White pieces. These two have played before.

International Master Jay Richard Bonin is one of the most active chess players of all time. Bonin has played thousands of USCF tournaments and thousands of blitz games both live and online.

In the nine games I have seen, Jay Bonin declined the BDG with 4...Nc6, 4...c5, 4...e5 or here 4...e3. Zilbermints has great practical experience with thousands of BDG blitz games. Lev said that in this game "Time Control was 7 minutes with 3 second delay."

Lev Zilbermints has defeated countless titled masters with this gambit. Lev Zilbermints added that around move 24, he told Bonin, "You will surrender to me."

The line 5.Bxe3 Bf5 is section 3.9 in my Blackmar-Diemer Games 2 book.

Zilbermints (2183) - Bonin (2420), Nassau Chess Club Blitz 29.08.2016 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.f3 d5 3.e4 dxe4 4.Nc3 e3 [Lev wrote: "Chicken!" Bonin laughed. The Blackmar-Diemer Gambit Accepted follows 4...exf3.] 5.Bxe3 Bf5 6.g4 Bg6 7.Nge2 Nc6 8.h4!? [The move 8.h4!? is optically dangerous for Black. However this move leaves c2 more vulnerable. Good alternatives are 8.a3 or 8.Nf4] 8...h5? [8...Nb4 9.Rc1=] 9.Nf4 e5 10.Nxg6 fxg6 11.g5 [11.Qd3! Bb4 12.0-0-0+/-] 11...Nd7?  [11...exd4! 12.Bd3 (12.gxf6?! dxe3 13.f7+ Kxf7 14.Bc4+ Ke8 15.Qd3 Qxd3 16.Bxd3 Ne5 17.Be4 Rd8 18.Rd1 Bd6=/+) 12...Bb4 13.Bxg6+ Kf8 14.Bxd4 Qxd4 15.Qxd4 Nxd4 16.gxf6 Nxf3+ 17.Ke2=] 12.Qd3 Ne7 13.0-0-0 c6 14.Bh3 Nf5 15.dxe5 Qc7 [15...Nxe5 16.Qe4+-] 16.f4 [Or 16.Bxf5 gxf5 17.Qxf5 Nxe5 18.Bf4+-] 16...0-0-0 17.Bxf5 gxf5 18.Qxf5 Bb4 [18...Be7 19.Rhe1+-] 19.e6 Nb6  [19...Rhf8 20.exd7+ Rxd7 21.Qxd7+ Qxd7 22.Rxd7 Kxd7 23.Rd1+ Kc7 24.Bd4+- and White is be up a knight.] 20.e7+ Rd7 21.Bxb6 axb6 22.Rhe1 Re8 23.a3 Bxe7 [23...Bxc3 24.bxc3 g6 25.Rxd7 Qxd7 26.Qxg6 Rxe7 27.Rxe7 Qxe7 28.Kb2 Kd8 29.Qxh5+- and White has three extra passed pawns in a queen endgame.] 24.Kb1 [24.Na4!+-] 24...b5 [24...Rf8 25.Qe6 Rfd8 26.f5+- with play similar to the game.] 25.Rd4 Rf8 26.Qe6 Rfd8 27.Red1 Bd6 [27...g6 28.Rxd7 Rxd7 29.Rxd7 Qxd7 30.Qxg6+- and White is up two pawns with a good position.] 28.f5 [All White has to do in blitz is to find any win. He does. Success! In a blitz game there is not always time to find the most brilliant win. Here White can pick off the bishop and more. 28.Rxd6! Qxd6 29.Rxd6 Kc7 30.Rxd7+ Rxd7 31.Qe5+ Kb6 32.f5+-] 28...Kb8 29.f6 gxf6 30.gxf6 Ka7 [30...c5 31.Nxb5+-] 31.Ne4 Bonin resigned and withdrew from the tournament. 1-0


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9 comments:

  1. Was this an over-the-board tourney? If so, how were the moves recorded, I wonder - by memory after the game? Also, was this game played in the Bahamas? Long way to go for a blitz tourney - unless u live there :)

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    1. Yes, it was over-the-board. Nassau County is on Long Island maybe 10 miles from JFK Airport in New York. It was a slower blitz game at a 7 3 time limit. Lev Zilbermints has a great memory and often plays 3 0 time limits. I imagine that half the game was in positions he had played before in the past 20 years.

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  2. According to my database, Lev Zilbermints played 9.Nf4 to win an ICC blitz game in 2004 in 17 moves. I have only a small fraction of his games.

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  3. I wrote moves with one hand and moved the pieces and hit the clock with the other. And yes, I have a great memory.

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  4. Wow, must be quick to write the moves down - I don't think I've ever seen someone write moves down in blitz - most of us would expect to lose on time if we tried that! ;) Though I also haven't seen anyone be able to play and write moves ambidextrously either! ;)

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    1. Yes, Lev had to be quick! In my youth I learned to move left handed and write the moves right handed. Now 40 years later it feels funny to pick up a piece with my right hand. The slow 7 3 speed means each player had about 7-8 seconds per move. This is an opening Lev has played thousands of times per year for over 20 years. Not a lot of thinking time used for the first half of the game. For the second half of the game, Bonin probably slowed down.

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  5. I write with my right hand and move with my left hand.

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  6. I learned to write with one hand and move the pieces with the other back in April - June 1993. At the time I was playing a 43-game thematic Blitz-Discussion-Match with my chess-friend Edward Kopiecki. We were debating the Zilbermints Gambit in the Euwe Defense to the BDG. I won with a combined score of 40-3. Of course, my speed in 5 minute chess was critical. And yes, I still have these old score-sheets! FYI, the games took place at the Marshall Chess Club in New York.

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