Friday, April 14, 2017

Rare Blackmar-Diemer vs Unrug

Diemer played the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit in this little-known tournament game against Dr. Unrug at Karlsruhe in 1956. The variation in a BDG Bogo. Emil J. Diemer developed his pieces to Bg5, Bc4, and Ne5. White had a great shot with 10.Nxf7! But sadly he captured 10.Nxd7?! After that, Black got a good position, but the great gambit player kept pushing for an attack. Black missed his best chances. White got enough counterplay to draw the position.

Clarification and explanation:
This was sent by Günter Brunold. After I published this blog he wrote (which I edit):
"Hello Tim! I was very pleased that you didn't forget the game. But I am bound to rectify some things:
1) Diemer's opponent was not called "Dr. Unrug" but "Dr. Unruh" (in Germany the "Unruh" in a clock is called in English the "balance wheel");
2) the game was not played in 1956 but in 1953;
3) the game did not finish in a draw. Emil Joseph (yes, with "ph"!!) Diemer ultimately won the fight.
You can read it in the Deutsche Schachzeitung 1953, p. 316: "After 19. ... Qf4, 20. d6! Qxh4, 21. Rxe4 Qf6,  22.Qxf6 exf6, 23. d7 White had a strong passed pawn warranting the draw. But black still spoilt the game in time pressure (or time trouble).""

If you like the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit, you might like some of my books:

Diemer - Dr. Unrug, Karlsruhe, 1956 began 1.d4 Nf6 2.f3 d5 3.e4 dxe4 4.Nc3 exf3 5.Nxf3 g6 6.Bg5 [6.Bc4 Bg7 7.Ne5 0-0 8.Bg5 is the most popular move order to reach the game continuation.] 6...Bg7 7.Bc4 0-0 8.Ne5 Nbd7 [Black usually plays this. The most difficult defense to meet in theory is 8...c5!-/+ ] 9.0-0 c5 [9...c6 10.Bb3 Nb6=/+] 10.Nxd7?! [Today we have the advantage of 60 years of experience watching master play and analyzing variations. Diemer had to plow virgin territory. White has a good continuation in 10.Nxf7! Rxf7 11.Bxf7+ Kxf7 12.dxc5=] 10...Bxd7 11.d5 [11.dxc5] 11...b5 12.Nxb5 Ne4 13.Bh4 Bxb5 14.Bxb5 Bxb2 15.Bc6 Rb8 16.Qe1 Bxa1 17.Qxa1 Qb6 [17...Qd6!-+] 18.c4 [18.Qe1!?] 18...Qc7 19.Re1 Qf4 [19...f5!-+] 20.d6 Qxh4 21.Rxe4 Qf6 22.Qxf6 exf6 23.d7 1/2-1/2


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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