Friday, March 24, 2017

BDG Huebsch John Crompton

Huebsch Gambit avoids Blackmar-Diemer Gambit in theory by not in spirit. The Huebsch keeps the feel, the tactics, and the strategy of the BDG. White has five reasonable responses after 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 Nxe4 (3...dxe4 4.f3 is a BDG) 4.Nxe4 dxe4. Options include 5.Bc4, 5.Be3, 5.Bf4, 5.c3, or 5.f3. Those interested in critical variations can find my detailed analysis in Blackmar-Diemer Theory 4.

Black is up a pawn but is missing the helpful Nf6. White does have compensation. If Black is rated over 2000 in a slow game, then White has his work cut out for him. If Black is rated below 2000 in a blitz game, White's chances skyrocket.

John Crompton as White (JECmate) prefers the logical 5.f3!? If Black accepts with 5...exf3 then in theory White has full compensation for the gambit. In practice, Black grabs the pawn about half the time. Crompton demonstrates that White can win quickly because he makes immediate threats that must be taken seriously, or else it's mate.

JECmate (1609) - Qu1ntana (1545), Live Chess Chess.com, 06.02.2017 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 Nxe4 4.Nxe4 dxe4 5.f3!? exf3 [5...e5!-/+] 6.Nxf3 g6 [In another Crompton game Black tried 6...Bg4 7.Bc4 (7.c3=) 7...e6 8.c3 Bd6 9.0-0 0-0 10.Bd3 Bxf3 11.Rxf3 Nd7 12.Bxh7+ (12.Qe2=) 12...Kh8 (12...Kxh7 13.Rh3+ Kg8 14.Qh5 f6-+) 13.Bd3 g6 14.Rh3+ Kg7 15.Bh6+ Kg8 16.Qg4 a6 17.Bxg6 Nf6 18.Qg5 Nh7 19.Bxh7+ Kxh7 20.Qg7 mate 1-0. JECmate - sexsy11, Chess.com 2017] 7.Bc4 Bg7 8.0-0 0-0 9.c3 Nd7 10.Qe1 Nf6 11.Bg5 a6 12.Qh4 b5 13.Bb3 Bb7 14.Bh6 Bd5 15.Ng5 Bxb3? [15...Re8 16.Bxg7 Kxg7 17.Rxf6 exf6 18.Qxh7+ Kf8 19.Rf1 Re2 20.Qh8+ Ke7 21.Qxf6+ Ke8 (21...Kd7 22.Bxd5+-) 22.Qh8+ Ke7= with a draw by repetition.] 16.Bxg7 [White stands much better after 16.axb3! Qd5 (16...Bh8 17.Bxf8 Kxf8 18.Nxh7+ Nxh7 19.Qxh7+-) 17.Bxg7 Kxg7 18.Rxf6 h6 19.Rxf7+ Rxf7 20.Nxf7 Qxf7 21.Rf1 Qe6 22.Re1+-] 16...Kxg7 17.Rxf6?! [This sacrifice is very tempting, but White should recapture the bishop first. 17.axb3 h6 18.Ne4=] 17...Kxf6? [Correct is 17...h6! and now if 18.Rf2 hxg5 19.Qxg5 Bd5-+ White is down a bishop.] 18.Rf1+ 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Wednesday, March 22, 2017

English Opening Jack Clauser

Outside the 1.d4 and 1.e4 lines, I enjoy Flank Openings. Jack Clauser and I played in person and by postal chess for about 10 years. In the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit world, Clauser is known for his interesting games. Also, Jack Clauser was the proofreader for several of my BDG books. Clauser offered me many good suggestions. Any mistakes that slipped through into print were not his fault.

It was relatively rare for me to play the English Opening. Playing a variety of openings improves my overall chess knowledge and experience but not my chess rating. To get and keep a high rating, you do best to play the same good lines over and over again.

In this game, Clauser treated the position like a Semi-Tarrasch Defence with 4.cxd5 Nxd5. The main difference was that Black retreated his knight with 5…Nc7 instead to capturing 5…Nxc3. The wide open symmetrical pawn structure was typical of a line in the Queens Gambit Accepted. This position was hard to win.

I published Flank Opening Puzzles which are 200 checkmates in the English Opening, Birds Opening, Dutch Defence and a few others.

My Chess Training Repertoire this week covers Bird's Opening. My email goes to those subscribed to my list at 11:45 AM Eastern time Thursday.

Sawyer - Clauser, corr 1996 begins 1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e3 Nc7 [Black could adopt a Gruenfeld approach with 5...Nxc3 6.bxc3 g6 7.d4 Bg7 8.Bd3 0-0 9.0-0 Qc7=] 6.Bc4 e6 7.0-0 Nc6 8.d4 Be7 [8...cxd4 9.exd4 Be7 10.Bf4+/=] 9.dxc5 Qxd1 10.Rxd1 Bxc5 11.Ne4 [Or 11.a3 and the position resembles a Queens Gambit Accepted.] 11...Be7 12.Nd6+ Bxd6 13.Rxd6 Ke7 14.Rd1 Rd8 15.Rxd8 Kxd8 16.Bd2 [16.b3+/=] 16...f6 17.b4 Bd7 18.b5 Ne7 19.a4 e5 20.Bd3 g6 21.e4 Rc8 22.Rd1 Ke8 23.Be3 a6 24.bxa6 Bxa4? [24...Nxa6!=] 25.Ra1 b5 26.a7 Nc6 27.h3? [Here White returns the favor. Now chances are equal again. White could obtain the better chances for an advantage with 27.g4! h6 28.Bxh6 Nxa7 29.g5 fxg5 30.Bxg5 Ne6 31.Bf6 Nc6 32.Nxe5 Nxe5 33.Bxe5+/=] 27...Ra8 28.Rc1 Kd7 29.Nh2 Nxa7 30.Ng4 Ne8 31.Ra1 Kc6 32.Bb1 Nc8 33.Ba2 Bb3 34.Rc1+ Bc4 35.Bxc4 bxc4 36.Rxc4+ Kd7 37.f3 1/2-1/2


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Monday, March 20, 2017

Rohde vs Miles Queens Knight

Anthony J. Miles (1955-2001) was a British grandmaster known for his activity and creativity. His rivals were Keene and Short. Grandmaster Tony Miles played the main lines and lesser known openings like 1…Nc6. I remember Miles beat the then World Champion Anatoly Karpov with 1.e4 a6 and again with 1.e4 c6.

Elijah Williams was one of the leading players in England during the Howard Staunton era in the 1800s. Opening theory was not well developed. Elijah Williams was known to play strategically sound openings that were what we might call offbeat. Williams tried 1.e4 Nc6 long before Aron Nimzowitsch played it. His earliest recorded Queens Knight Defence was from 1845. His handling of it was amazingly modern with 2.Nf3 d6.

The strategy behind the Williams idea is to play ...Bg4 combined with Nf6, e6 and Be7. Black's central pawns will likely advance to d5 or e5 depending on later developments. It's not super aggressive chess, but it takes away some of White's fun. This line is easy to set-up. Black must push back as soon as he is ready to avoid playing passively, and thus poorly. Many other players have added this variation to their repertoire. Some of the more notable were Rainer Knaak, Hugh Myers and Tony Miles. In this game Michael Rohde lost to Anthony Miles in the Queens Knight Defence. I lost to Rohde in the 1974 US Junior Open blitz tournament, but there I began just 1…c6 instead of 1…Nc6.

Rohde - Miles, Masters Invitational Chicago (6), 1990 begins 1.e4 Nc6 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 Nf6 4.d5 Nb8 5.Nc3 g6 6.Bg5 Bg4 7.Qd2 Bxf3 8.gxf3 Nbd7 9.0-0-0 c6 10.Kb1 Bg7 11.Bh6 [11.Rg1+/=] 11...Bxh6 12.Qxh6 Qb6 13.Bh3 Ne5 14.Rhg1 Qxf2 15.f4 Nc4 16.e5 Nh5 17.exd6 Qxf4 18.d7+  [18.Rg5=] 18...Kd8 19.Rg5 [19.Qxf4 Nxf4-/+] 19...Nxb2 20.Kxb2 Qb4+ 21.Kc1 Qxc3 22.Rd3 Qe1+ 23.Kb2 Qb4+ [23...f5!-+] 24.Rb3 Qd4+ 25.Kb1 f5 [25...c5!-/+] 26.Rxb7 [26.Bxf5 Qd1+ 27.Kb2 Qxd5 28.Bh3=] 26...Qd1+ 27.Kb2 Qxd5 28.Rxh5 [28.Bxf5 c5-/+] 28...c5 29.Qg7 [29.Rb5 gxh5-+] 29...Qxb7+ 30.Kc1 Qh1+ 0-1


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Friday, March 17, 2017

Blackmar-Diemer Ryder Normand

Nicolas Normand of France wins with the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit Ryder. He finds a mating attack in a similar fashion as seen in the BDG Euwe Variation. Nicolas sent me this comment: "I succeeded in winning a 1950-elo player of my club on the board in a 5mn blitz with the same position and 10.Bxh6 sacrifice."

The Ryder Gambit 5.Qxf3 is a risk in the same way double teaming a player in sports would be. White's offensive threats are so dangerous that Black does not bother with whatever is left uncovered. If your opponent has plenty of time, if he never gets nervous, if he always defends perfectly, then you could be in trouble. Real chess is not like that.

Your opponent will miss things when you make big threats, especially in blitz play. Here Normand rips open Black's kingside. White finds a forced checkmate. At the end, Black has only two pieces remaining and those pieces never moved.

Deathstar81 - NN, Lichess (5mn + 5s), 20.01.2017 begins 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Qxf3 e6 6.Bd3 Be7 [6...h6 would transpose to another game Nicolas played that went 7.Nge2 Bd6 8.0-0 a6 9.Ne4 Be7 10.c3 Nbd7 11.N2g3 (11.Bc2!?+/=) 11...e5? (11...0-0 12.Nxf6+ Nxf6 13.Bxh6 gxh6 14.Qf4=) 12.Nh5 0-0 13.Bxh6 Nxh5 14.Qxh5 Nf6 15.Nxf6+ Bxf6 16.Bxg7 Bxg7 17.Qh7# 1-0 DEATHSTAR81-ramafi52/Chess.com 2016] 7.Nge2 0-0 8.0-0 Nc6 9.Qh3 h6 10.Bxh6 gxh6? [The critical line is 10...e5 11.Qh4 Ng4 12.Bg5 g6 when White has 13.Ne4+/-] 11.Qxh6 Re8 12.Rf3 [12.Rxf6!+-] 12...Ne4 13.Nxe4 Ne5 14.Rg3+ Ng6 15.Rxg6+ fxg6 16.Qxg6+ Kf8 17.Rf1+ Bf6 18.Rxf6+ Qxf6 19.Qxf6+ Kg8 20.Ng5 Re7 21.Qxe7 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Blindfold King Wins GW Gambit

Timur Gareyev won a Gibbins-Weidenhagen Gambit while he was setting the record at the Blindfold King. This gambit begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.g4!? White's plan is to gain time at the cost of the g-pawn. Black is usually surprised and totally on his own at this point. The natural continuation is to accept the gambit followed by moving the d-pawn to protect his knight.

Humphry Bogart played a famous game in this opening. Diemer, Bronstein, Gibbins, Krabbe and a host of Blackmar-Diemer Gambit players have ventured this gambit against Black's invitation to play the Indian Defences. I've played it a few times myself in blitz games just for something different. In this game, Gareyev faced James Stuart. Black played pretty well for the first dozen moves. Then the grandmaster's skill took over.

Gareyev (2618) - Stuart, Gareyev Blindfold Simul Las Vegas USA (1.33), 03.12.2016 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.g4 Nxg4 3.e4 d6 [3...d5 4.Be2 Nf6 5.e5 Nfd7 6.Nf3 Nb6=/+] 4.f3 Nf6 5.Be3 e5 6.Nc3 c6 [6...Nc6=/+] 7.Qd2 Nbd7 8.0-0-0 Qc7 9.f4 Ng4 10.Bh3 [10.Nf3!?] 10...Nxe3 [10...Nb6=/+] 11.Qxe3 Be7 12.Nf3 h6 [12...exf4 13.Qxf4 g6=] 13.Rhg1 Rg8 [13...exf4 14.Qxf4 g5=] 14.dxe5 [14.fxe5 dxe5 15.Kb1+/-] 14...dxe5 15.Bxd7+ Bxd7 16.Nxe5 Rd8 [16...Be6! 17.Nf3+/=] 17.Qxa7 [17.Nxd7 Rxd7 18.e5+-] 17...g5 18.Nxd7 Qxf4+ 19.Kb1 Rxd7 20.Rxd7 Kxd7 21.Qxb7+ Qc7 22.Rd1+ Bd6 23.Qb3 Ke7 24.Rf1 Rg7 [24...Kf8 25.Qe6+/-] 25.h3 Kf8 26.a4 Qc8 27.Ne2 Qa6 28.Qf3 [28.Rd1 Qxe2 29.Rxd6+-] 28...Be7 [28...Qxa4 29.Qd3+/-] 29.Nd4 Qc8 30.Nf5 Rh7 31.Nxh6 Qe8 [31...Qe6 32.Nf5+-] 32.Ng4 Qd7 33.e5 Qc8 34.a5 Qa6 35.Qf5 Kg8 36.Nh6+ [Or 36.e6+-] 36...Kh8 37.Nxf7+ 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Sicilian (1.e4 c5)
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Monday, March 13, 2017

Sicilian Defence Dragon Sedlock

One of my better Dragon Sicilians was against Ervin Sedlock from Illinois, the home of Jim and Helen Warren. It appears Erv Sedlock retired to Florida. I did the same thing. Sedlock was a USCF National Tournament Director. Erv Sedlock played chess for over 60 years. We contested a popular Sicilian Defence Dragon. This game saw the battle of two rooks. Black doubled his rooks on the c-file. They were ready for attack. Meanwhile the White pawns were racing toward the Black king. Soon the White queen invaded.

White doubled his rooks on the first rank. Then the kingside pawns disappeared, The White rooks on g1 and h1 proved to be very powerful on those open lines. Black had the advantage of the two bishops against two knights. However, White had the initiative. His knights were side by side hitting many strategic squares. The Black king was flushed out of the pocket to the open field. In a tactical combination Black lost one of his bishops. Down a piece in the endgame, Black resigned.

Sawyer (2150) - Sedlock (2000), corr APCT 1982 begins 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 Nc6 8.Bc4 0-0 9.Qd2 Bd7 10.0-0-0 Ne5 11.Bb3 Qa5 12.h4 Rfc8 13.Kb1 Nc4 14.Bxc4 Rxc4 15.Nb3 Qd8 [15...Qc7 16.g4+/=] 16.Bh6 [16.e5!+/-] 16...Bh8 [16...Bxh6 17.Qxh6+/=] 17.h5 Rac8 18.hxg6 hxg6 19.g4?! [19.e5!+/-] 19...b5 [19...Bxg4!=] 20.Qh2 b4 21.Bf8  [Wrong direction. Correct is 21.Bf4! Bg7 22.Nd5 Nxd5 23.Qh7+ Kf8 24.Bh6+-] 21...Nh5 22.gxh5 Qxf8 [22...g5 23.Bxe7 Qxe7 24.Nd5+/-] 23.hxg6 Qg7 24.gxf7+ Kxf7 25.Qh5+ Qg6 26.Qxg6+ Kxg6 27.Rdg1+ Kf7 28.Rh7+ Ke6 29.Nd5 Bf6 30.Rg6 Re8 31.Rxe7+ Rxe7 32.Rxf6+ Ke5 33.f4+ Kxe4 34.Nxe7 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Friday, March 10, 2017

Caro-Kann BDG Gareev Gambit

Timur Gareyev tries to take a Caro-Kann Defence and turn it into a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit. The Russian Grandmaster Aleksandr Shimanov played the Black pieces. This Caro-Kann began 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4. Normally White recaptures with 4.Nxe4 with a good game. The opening theory of this position involves extensive deep analysis based on strategical understanding.

A tactically minded player like the Blindfold King Gareyev can offer an invitation to play a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit with 4.f3!? Black must play an early ...Nf6 by move seven to fully transpose to some exact BDG position. GM Shimanov avoided the BDG until White goes his own way on move eight. I always find it interesting that a grandmaster rated 2642 would avoid taking the gambit pawn. For a moment Black also avoided the draw by repetition. In the final position, White has a very slight edge.

Gareyev (2617) - Shimanov (2642), 3rd Chinggis Invitational Burlingame USA (8), 25.02.2017 begins 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.f3 exf3 5.Nxf3 Bg4 6.h3 Bxf3 7.Qxf3 e6 [7...Nf6 is a BDG Teichmann.] 8.Bd2 [8.Be3 or 8.Qf2] 8...Nf6 [8...Qxd4 9.0-0-0 Nd7=] 9.0-0-0 [9.Qf2 Nbd7=] 9...Be7 [9...Qxd4 10.Bf4 Qb6 11.Be2 Be7 12.Qg3=] 10.g4 [10.Be1!?] 10...Qxd4 11.Nb5 Qb6 [11...cxb5 12.Qxb7 0-0 13.Qxe7 Nc6 14.Qa3 Qd5=/+] 12.Be3 Qa5 13.Bd2 Qb6 14.Be3 Qa5 15.Bd2 Qb6 16.Be3 c5 [16...Qa5 draw by repetition.] 17.Bf4 [Black could be in trouble, but he will have some compensation for the Exchange after 17...0-0 18.Nc7 and 19.Nxa8+=] 1/2-1/2


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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