Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Blackmar-Diemer Caro Gambit

John Crompton sent me these Blackmar-Diemer Gambit gems. The line can be reached via the Caro-Kann Defence. Black should play 6...Bf5. But for many, the temptation to pin the White knight by 6...Bg4 is too strong for many players to ignore.

JECmate (1634) - aldrenalin (1627), Chess.com, 13.11.2017 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 dxe4 4.f3 exf3 5.Nxf3 c6 6.Bc4 Bg4 [6...Bf5] 7.Bxf7+ Kxf7 8.Ne5+ Kg8 9.Nxg4
9...Nbd7 [9...Nxg4 10.Qxg4 Nd7 11.Qe6# 1-0 JECmate - MiguelOrozco, Chess.com 2017] 10.0-0 Nxg4 11.Qxg4 Nf6 12.Qe6# 1-0

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Dutch Defence Suprise Win

Rick Torning (Kid_Coach) sent me a Dutch Defence bullet game with this comment:
"Against Shabalov (2408) I used my faithful Basman Variation of the Dutch Defence and managed a pawn fork on d4 which wins a knight or bishop. Perhaps they too were fasting? (The computer refers to it as the Raphael Defence?)"

Dr. Benjamin I. Raphael of Louisville, Kentucky played 1.d4 f5 2.Nc3 as White against Napoleon Marache of New York in the 1857 American Chess Congress. Play continued 2...Nf6 3.Nf3 e6 and White won with a mate on move 30. Paul Morphy won the event.

[My Main Line 1.d4 Playbook is available in Kindle and Paperback.]

Shabalov (2408) - Kid_Coach (1801), Casual Bullet game lichess, 22.10.2017 begins 1.d4 f5 2.Nc3 d6 3.e4 g6 4.f3 [4.exf5 Bxf5 5.Nf3 Bg7 6.Bd3+/-] 4...Bg7 5.Be3 [5.Bc4+/=] 5...Nh6 [5...Nc6!?] 6.Qd2 Nf7 7.0-0-0 Nc6 8.h4 [8.Kb1+/-] 8...e5 9.h5? [9.d5!?+/-] Black's bishop fianchetto is strong at one second per move.
9...exd4 White left the game. 0-1

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Monday, November 20, 2017

Modern Defence Disaster 1.d4 g6

Ray Haines won a Modern Defence double fianchetto. Although Black developed rapidly and castled, he did not challenge the center with any pawns for the first dozen moves. If your opponent abandons the center, occupy it! Ray Haines did and got a great game. He aimed at the kingside. By move 13, White could force open lines against the Black king. Chess opening elements are time, force, space, and pawn structure. When Black gave up space and pawn structure, White changed his plans to take advantage and win.

[My Main Line 1.d4 Playbook is available in Kindle and Paperback.]

rrhaines33 (1559) - bhanu2358 (1526), Live Chess Chess.com, 16.11.2017 begins 1.d4 g6 2.e4 b6 3.Nc3 Bb7 4.Be3 Bg7 5.Qd2 Nf6 6.f3 Nc6 7.0-0-0 0-0 8.g4 [White can gain more space with 8.e5! Ne8 9.f4 e6 10.Nf3+/-] 8...a5 [8...e5 9.Nge2 Ne8 10.d5+/=] 9.Bh6 [Also good is 9.h4+/-] 9...Nb4 [If 9...Bxh6 10.Qxh6 e5 11.Nge2+/=] 10.a3 Nc6 11.h4 Ne8 12.Bxg7 Kxg7 [Black has still not moved a center pawn. 12...Nxg7 13.h5+-] 13.h5 
13...d6 14.hxg6 fxg6 15.Qh6+ Kf6 16.Nd5+ [Or 16.Bc4!+-] 16...Ke6 17.Qxh7 [17.Qxf8+-] 17...Kd7 18.Qxg6 Nf6 19.g5 Nxd5 20.Bh3+ e6 21.Qxe6# 1-0

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Sunday, November 19, 2017

Caro-Kann Defence BDG Trap

I've received several Caro-Kann Defence games which contain the same tricky trap from different move orders. The opening transposes into the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit.

Richard Torning comments on his games as White: "Against OhNooo (1760) the Caro Kann turned into a Ziegler Defence to my BDG. Black chose to castle long and after 15 moves had the choice of being checkmated on b8 or losing the queen for a bishop. Lastly, Igrethu (1988) ended up in an 8 move checkmate via the Caro Kann transposing into the BDG Ziegler Defence! Should never take that 'jail-bait' little queen on d1!"

Kid_Coach (1801) - OhNooo (1760), Casual Bullet game lichess, 22.10.2017 begins 1.d4 d5 2.Nc3 c6 3.e4 dxe4 4.f3!? [4.Nxe4] 4...exf3 5.Nxf3 Nf6 [With this move the opening has transposed into a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit.] 6.Bc4 Bg4? [6...Bf5] 7.Ne5!? [White regains the gambit pawn with attack after 7.Bxf7+! Kxf7 8.Ne5+ Kg8 9.Nxg4+/-]
7...Be6! [The classic blunder was seen in 7...Bxd1? 8.Bxf7# 1-0 Kid_Coach - lgrethu, lichess 2017] 8.Bxe6 fxe6 9.0-0 Nbd7 10.Bf4 Nxe5 [10...g6 11.Qd3 Bg7 12.Qh3 Rf8 13.Rad1+/-] 11.Bxe5 Qd7 [11...g6 12.Ne4+/-] 12.Ne2 [12.Qf3!+-] 12...0-0-0 [12...g6 13.Qd3 Bg7 14.Rae1 0-0=] 13.c3 Nd5 [13...g5 14.Nc1+/-] 14.Qa4 Nb6? 15.Qxa7 1-0

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Saturday, November 18, 2017

Winckelmann-Reimer Gambit

Gary Zintgraff backed into a French Defence Winawer that transposed to a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit Euwe line 5.Nxf3 e6 6.Bg5 Bb4 7.a3 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3. Zintgraff wrote:
"Dear Tim: Here is a 5 0 Blitz game played on 2/1999 at the San Antonio Chess Club tournament where I defeated a solid expert, John Hyltin. It shows a transposition from two other openings to get to a typical BDG attack. He has been an "over the board" tournament expert for over 25 years. I was rated about 1780 at the time. He has been very strong with the French Defense and the Nimzo-Indian, but still, I was very happy to get to play the Winckelmann-Reimer Gambit (deferred) against him after he avoided my Paleface Attack (deferred). My opening strategy was trying to get some form or "cousin" of the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit against him to have a fighting chance. His 7...exf3?! gave me that chance! Sincerely, Gary Zintgraff"

Zintgraff - Hyltin, San Antonio CC, 02.1999 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.f3 e6 4.e4 Bb4 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 dxe4 7.Bg5?! exf3?! 8.Nxf3 [Now I had a BDG.] 8...0-0 9.Bd3 h6 10.h4 Nbd7 11.Qd2 Re8 12.Bxh6 gxh6? 13.Qxh6 Nf8 14.Ng5 Qe7?! 15.0-0 Ng6??
16.Rxf6? [Much better for White would have been: 16.Bxg6! Qf8 17.Bxf7+ Qxf7 18.Nxf7 and mates] 16...Qxf6 17.Qh7+ Kf8 18.Rf1 [Resigns. With more time he might have tried 18...Nf4 19.Qe4 Qh6 20.Qxf4 f5 21.Qxc7 Qg7 22.Qd6+ while 18...Qxf1+?? or Ke7?? both lead to mate or an overwhelming White position.] 1-0 [Edited Notes by Zintgraff]

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
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Friday, November 17, 2017

London System Win Alekseev

Double threats defeat talent. Weak opponents fall to a single threat. Strong opponents defend and fight back. You beat good players when you threaten two things at the same time. You could threaten to win a piece or checkmate in tactics. You could threaten to win on both sides of the board in strategy. In this London System, Evgeny Alekseev won the b-pawn against Alexander Kamnev. Then Grandmaster Alekseev threatened the kingside with 26.Rf4. When Black defended, White played a winning combination.

[My Main Line 1.d4 Playbook is available in Kindle and Paperback.]

Alekseev (2622) - Kamnev (2132), Chigorin Memorial 2017 St Petersburg RUS (1.5), 21.10.2017 begins 1.d4 d5 2.Bf4 Nf6 3.e3 e6 4.Nd2 c5 5.c3 Nc6 6.Ngf3 h6 7.Bd3 Bd6 8.Bg3 Bxg3 9.hxg3 Qd6 10.Qe2 Bd7 [More common would be 10...0-0 11.dxc5 Qxc5 12.e4=] 11.Rd1 0-0-0 12.e4 dxe4 13.Nxe4 Nxe4 14.Bxe4 cxd4 15.Nxd4 Qe5 16.0-0 [16.Nb5!?] 16...Kb8 17.Qf3 Nxd4 18.cxd4 Qf6 19.Bxb7 Qxf3 20.Bxf3 Bb5 21.Rfe1 Bc4 22.Re5 Rd6 23.b3 Ba6 24.d5 Rhd8 25.Rd4 Bb7 26.Rf4 f6 [26...Bxd5 27.Rxf7 R8d7 28.Rxd7 Rxd7 29.Kf1 Bxf3 30.gxf3+/-] 27.Rxe6 Bxd5 [27...Rxe6 28.dxe6 Bxf3 29.gxf3+/-] White to play and win the Exchange or the bishop.
28.Rxd6 1-0 [If 28...Rxd6 29.Rd4 pins the bishop and wins material.]

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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