Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Ted Dunst Attacks 1.d4 Nc6

New York was the hub to US chess in the days of Marshall, Reinfeld, Fine, Reshevsky, and Fischer. Most cities have a significant chess scene with local masters, but New York also had books and magazine publications in the days before the Internet. I think Ted Dunst wrote for Chess Review. Theodore Alexander Dunst (1907-1985) was a New York master famous for playing offbeat or less popular opening lines. Among those openings were both 1.Nc3 as White and 1…Nc6 as Black.

I have only a small selection of his games, less than two dozen. About have the time Dunst played 1.Nc3 or 1…Nc6 as Black. The rest of his games were in a variety of other openings. I have seen only a few games by W. Radspinner. Ted Dunst played his favorite Queens Knight Defence this time with 1.d4 Nc6.

[My new Queens Gambit Playbook covers lines after 1.d4 d5 2.c4.]

Radspinner - Dunst, New York 1957 begins 1.d4 Nc6 2.c4 e5 3.d5 Nce7 4.e4 [4.Nc3 Ng6 5.Nf3 Bb4 6.Bd2 a5 7.e3 d6=] 4...Ng6 5.Bd3 [5.Be3 Bb4+ 6.Nd2 Nf6 7.Bd3 b6=] 5...Bc5 6.Nf3 d6 7.Be3  [7.0-0 a5 8.Bg5!?=] 7...Bxe3 8.fxe3 Nh6 9.Qe2 0-0 10.h3 f5
11.exf5 [11.Nc3=] 11...Nxf5 [11...Bxf5 12.Nbd2 e4 13.Nxe4 Re8=] 12.Bxf5 Bxf5 13.Nc3 e4 14.Nd4 Qh4+ 15.Kd2 Ne5 16.Raf1 Bd7 17.b3  Nd3 18.Nd1 [18.Rxf8+ Rxf8 19.Rf1=] 18...a6 19.a4 b5 20.Rxf8+ Rxf8 [20...Kxf8=/+] 21.Rf1  [21.axb5 axb5 22.cxb5 Qg5 23.Rf1=] 21...Rb8 [21...Ra8!-/+] 22.Kc3 [22.cxb5 axb5 23.axb5 Bxb5 24.Nc3 Bd7=/+] 22...bxa4 23.Nf2 Ne5 24.b4 c5 25.dxc6 Nxc6 26.Nxc6 Bxc6 27.Nd1 [27.Qd2 Qf6+ 28.Qd4 Qxd4+ 29.exd4 Rf8-+] 27...Qe7 28.Qh5 [28.Qb2 Qe5+ 29.Kc2 Qxb2+ 30.Kxb2 Rxb4+ 31.Kc3 Rxc4+ 32.Kxc4 Bb5+ 33.Kb4 Bxf1-+ and White is down three pawns in a minor piece endgame.] 28...d5 29.cxd5 Qxb4+ 30.Kc2 Qc4+ 31.Kd2 Qxf1 32.dxc6 Rd8+ 33.Kc1 Qc4+ 34.Kb1 Qd3+ 35.Kb2 Rb8+ 0-1

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Monday, September 18, 2017

Queens Gambit Exchange Attack

Ron Chaney chose the Queens Gambit Declined Exchange Variation against me in a postal chess event. I owned a book by Kevin Wicker entitled “How to Play the Queen's Gambit Exchange Variation" published in 1976. I studied and played that opening from each side. It favors players who plan their strategy. I fly by the seat of my pants. If I only look for creative tactics and ignore strategy, I can get beat by a man with a plan.

My understanding of this line was insufficient. I attacked when I should have defended. My attack consisted of 14...Bf5, 17...Qg5 and 18...Re6. My pieces were uncoordinated and undefended. A strong attacker prepares his pieces. He brings a huge army to the fight. My approach was flawed. I sent out one piece at a time. I hoped that eventually, my whole army would surround my opponent’s king. My plan was ineffective. I lost a bishop.

[My new Queens Gambit Playbook includes the Exchange Variation.]

Chaney - Sawyer, corr APCT 78SC-5, 1978 begins 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bg5 Be7 6.e3 0-0 7.Bd3 c6 [Or 7...h6 8.Bh4 c6=] 8.Qc2 Nbd7 [Black could relieve the pressure on his h-pawn with 8...h6 9.Bh4 Re8=] 9.Nf3 Re8 10.0-0 Nf8 11.Rab1 a5 [An alternative is 11...Ne4 12.Bxe7 Qxe7 13.Bxe4 dxe4 14.Nd2 f5=] 12.a3 Ne4 13.Bxe7 Qxe7 14.b4 [14.Bxe4 dxe4 15.Nd2 f5=] 14...Bf5 [14...axb4 15.axb4 Nxc3 16.Qxc3 Bg4=] 15.Bxe4 [15.b5!?] 15...dxe4 16.Ne5 [16.Nd2 axb4 17.axb4 Nd7=] 16...axb4 17.axb4 Qg5?! [Better was 17...Qe6=] 18.Ne2 [Black to move]
18...Re6?! [Black impulsively decides to attack when he should be solidifying his position with 18...Be6=] 19.Ng3 f6 [Black needs to save his bishop with 19...Bg6 20.Rfc1+/-] 20.h4 Qxh4 21.Nxf5 Qg5 22.f4 exf3 23.Nxf3 Qg4 24.Nh2 1-0

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Friday, September 15, 2017

Ray Haines Explores Caro-Kann

I love the Caro-Kann. It's like an old pair of shoes. It's not flashy but comfortable. When Ray Haines showed me this opening over 40 years ago, the moves made sense to me.
I hate the Caro-Kann. Often, what seems like a simple position contains a subtle tactic that I can easily sleep through like ignoring my alarm clock.
Here's a game Haines sent me that illustrates my points. It's an online game. I don't intend to judge either player too harshly. I hope they enjoyed playing.
On move 9 castling is an obvious sound strategy for Black, but there he had available an unusual sharp possibility that wins a piece outright after 9...f5!
On move 67 White has a queen vs Black's a-pawn on the "seventh rank." Endgames like this are drawn unless the White king can get to b3 after the pawn queens on a1. Wouldn't you know it, this time White had a win! Well, I might have missed either of these moves myself in a blitz game. Best wishes in finding subtle tactics in your games!

[My Caro-Kann Playbook is available in Kindle digital and in paperback.]

jasonyoung1972 - rrhaines33, Live Chess Chess.com, 30.08.2017 begins 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Bd3 dxe4 4.Bxe4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nxe4 6.Nxe4 Nd7 7.Qf3 e6 8.Bf4 Be7 9.Bd6? [9.Nd6+ Bxd6 10.Bxd6+/=]
9...0-0 [9...f5! 10.Bxe7 fxe4 11.Bxd8 exf3 12.Nxf3 Kxd8-+] 10.Bxe7 Qxe7 11.0-0-0 Nb6 12.Nc5 Nd5 13.c4 Nf6 14.Nh3 b6 15.Ne4 Bb7 [15...Nxe4 16.Qxe4 Ba6-/+] 16.Nxf6+ Qxf6 17.Qxf6 gxf6 18.Nf4 Rac8 19.Nh5 f5 20.f3 Rfd8 21.g4 fxg4 22.Rhg1 Kf8 23.Rxg4 c5 24.Rg3 [24.d5=] 24...cxd4 25.b3 Rc5 [25...b5 26.Kd2 bxc4 27.bxc4 Rxc4-+] 26.Nf6 h6 27.Rg8+ Ke7 28.Rxd8 Kxd8 29.Rxd4+ Ke7 30.Rd7+ Kxf6 31.Rxb7 Ra5 32.a4 Kg6 33.Kd2 f6 34.Ke3 Kf5 35.h4 Ke5 36.Rh7 Kd6 37.Rxh6 Re5+ 38.Kf2 f5 39.h5 f4 40.Kg2 Rg5+ 41.Kh3 Ke5 42.Kh4 Kf5 [42...Rg3=] 43.Rg6 Rxg6 44.hxg6 Kxg6 45.Kg4 e5 [45...Kf6 46.Kxf4+-] 46.b4 Kf6 47.c5 bxc5 48.bxc5 Ke6 49.c6 Kd6 [49...a6 50.c7 Kd7 51.Kf5 Kxc7 52.Kxe5 Kd8 53.Kxf4+-] 50.Kf5 Kxc6 [50...a6 51.c7 Kxc7 52.Kxe5 Kd8 53.Kxf4+-] 51.Kxe5 a5 [51...Kc5 52.Kxf4+-] 52.Kxf4 Kc5 53.Ke5 Kb4 [53...Kc6 54.Ke6+-] 54.f4 [54.Kd4 Kxa4 55.Kc4 Ka3 56.f4 Kb2 57.f5+-] 54...Kxa4 55.f5 Kb3 56.f6 a4 57.f7 a3 58.f8Q a2 59.Qf7+ Kb2 60.Qb7+ Ka1 61.Qa6 Kb1 62.Qb5+ Ka1 63.Qa4 Kb1 64.Qb3+ Ka1 65.Qc3+ Kb1 66.Qd3+ Ka1?  [66...Kb2=]
67.Qd1+ [67.Kd4! Kb2 68.Qd2+ Kb1 69.Kc3 a1Q+ 70.Kb3+-] 67...Kb2 68.Qd2+ Kb1 69.Qb4+ Ka1 70.Qa3 Kb1 71.Qd3+ Kb2 72.Qd2+ Kb1 73.Qb4+ Ka1 74.Qe1+ Kb2 75.Qb4+ Ka1 76.Qc3+ Kb1 77.Qb3+ Ka1 78.Qd1+ Kb2 79.Qe2+ Kb1 80.Qd3+ Kb2 81.Qb5+ Ka1 82.Qf1+ Kb2 83.Qe2+ Kb1 84.Qd3+ Kb2 85.Qb5+ Ka1 86.Qc4 Kb1 87.Ke4 a1Q 88.Qb3+ Qb2 89.Qxb2+ Kxb2 1/2-1/2

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Isler Wins Blackmar-Diemer 4...c5

Black declined a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit with 4.f3 c5. More common is to accept the gambit with 4...exf3 or to decline by 4...Bf5. The first thought is that at least White is not going to be down material. However in this game, after 5.Bb5+ Bd7 6.dxc5 exf3 7.Nxf3, Black grabbed the gambit pawn anyway.

The battle ensued over c5 and then f4. Benjamin Isler won against Christiane Rommeck in Germany last month. Tactics were missed and mistakes made in complications from moves 17 to 20. Then White found a way to win a knight.

[My Blackmar-Diemer Games 5 in 1 of 4 books in my new Blackmar-Diemer Series II.]

Isler (1897) - Rommeck (1616), 30th Kiel Open 2017 Kiel GER (7.42), 02.08.2017 begins 1.e4 d5 2.d4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 c5
5.Bb5+ [5.d5 or 5.Bf4] 5...Bd7 6.dxc5 [6.d5!?] 6...exf3 [6...e6=/+] 7.Nxf3 Nc6 8.0-0 e6 9.Be3 Qc7 10.Ng5 Be7 11.Qe2 [11.Nce4 Nxe4 12.Nxe4=] 11...0-0 12.Bd3 h6 13.Nge4 Nxe4 14.Nxe4 Ne5 15.Rad1 Nxd3 16.cxd3?! [16.Qxd3=] 16...f5! 17.Nf2 Bxc5? [17...Bb5!-/+] 18.Rc1! b6 19.b4?! [19.d4!+-] 19...Qe5 [19...f4!=] 20.bxc5 f4 21.Ng4 Qg5 22.Bd2 bxc5 23.Ne5 Be8 24.Qe4 Bh5 [Or 24...Rc8 25.Rxf4+-] 25.Bxf4 1-0

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Monday, September 11, 2017

French Defence Classical 7.Nb5

The French Defence Classical Variation is 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e5 Nfd7 6.Bxe7 Qxe7. Everyone plays 7.f4. Ok, not everyone. I do like 7.f4, but here I tried the knight sortie 7.Nb5!? Both sides lose a time. The knight could relocate via Na3-Nc2-Ne3. Black swapped off queens to keep White from castling. White wanted to have the better bishop for an endgame. Black chose a tactical middle game that led to a different endgame.

In the 1990s Jimmy E. Irvin was an active correspondence chess player. Many of his games were played by email. ICCF listed Jimmy Irvin with a rating of 2324 after a total of 54 games. Jimmy Irvin and I played twice in APCT email sections. This game was a French Defence. In our other game, Irvin played White in an English Opening.

This game featured an Exchange sacrifice by Black beginning 24…Rxf3+. There followed by a long series of captures to 31…cxb3. The resulting position left Black with two connected passed pawns and a bishop for the White rook. A draw was agreed in an equal but unbalanced endgame.

My Blackmar-Diemer Games 5 in 1 of 4 books in my new Blackmar-Diemer Series II. My collection Chess Games 1.e4 Series has 5 books in 1, including French Defence. The companion volume is Chess Games 1.d4 Series. My French 3.Be3 Playbook is available in Kindle Unlimited, digital, and paperback.

Sawyer (1960) - Irvin (2200), corr APCT EMQ-2, 30.07.1996 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 e6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e5 Nfd7 6.Bxe7 Qxe7 7.Nb5!? [7.f4] 7...Qd8 [7...Nb6 8.c3 a6 9.Na3 c5 10.f4=] 8.c3  [8.c4 dxc4 9.Bxc4 a6 10.Nc3 c5 11.dxc5 0-0 12.Nf3 Nxc5 13.0-0=] 8...a6 9.Na3 c5 10.f4 cxd4  [10...Nc6 11.Nf3 Qb6 12.Qd2 0-0 13.b3=] 11.cxd4 Qa5+ 12.Qd2 Qxd2+ 13.Kxd2 Nc6 14.Nf3 0-0 15.Nc2 Nb6 16.b3 Bd7 17.Bd3 a5 18.a4 Rac8 19.Rac1 f6 20.Ke3 Be8 21.g4 fxe5 22.fxe5 h6 23.h4 Rf7 24.Na3 Rxf3+ 25.Kxf3 Nxd4+ 26.Ke3 Rxc1 27.Rxc1 Nxb3 28.Rb1 Bxa4 29.Bc2 Nc4+ 30.Nxc4 dxc4 31.Bxb3 [Despite the fireworks the position has remained equal for a long time. White could try 31.h5=] 31...cxb3 [Or 31...Bxb3=] 32.Kd4 b6 33.Kc3 Kh7 34.Rd1 b2 35.Rb1 Kg6 36.Rxb2 b5 37.Rf2 Bd1 38.Rf4 Be2 39.Kd2 Bc4 40.Kc3 Bd5 41.Kc2 Bc6 1/2-1/2

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Friday, September 8, 2017

Sicilian Defence Dragon 9.Bc4

The sharp Sicilian Defence Dragon Variation gives stronger players a big advantage. Better players to take advantage of tactical mistakes by their opponents. Tactics rule in chess play. Good chess moves must be safe and active. Higher rated players excel in combinations and checkmates when compared to their lower rated counterparts.

Dave Dieffenbach boldly played sharp openings, but this gave him many opportunities to go wrong. In 1996, David was rated in 1252. I was rated 2010. Black choose moves that were active but not safe. Black's 12...Ba6?! and 13...b5? allowed White the strong post 15.Nd5 with serious threats. White reached an endgame up a rook and two pawns for Black's light squared bishop.

Sawyer - Dieffenbach, Williamsport, PA 1996 begins 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 Nc6 8.Qd2 0-0 9.Bc4 Qc7 10.Bb3 Nxd4 11.Bxd4 b6 [11...Be6=] 12.h4 Ba6?!  [12...Be6 13.0-0-0+/=] 13.0-0-0 b5? 14.Bxf6 Bxf6 15.Nd5
15...Qc6 [This loses the Exchange, but Black's game also falls apart after 15...Qd8 16.Nxf6+ exf6 17.Qf4+-] 16.Nxf6+ exf6 17.Bd5 Qc5 18.Bxa8 Rxa8 19.Qxd6 Qxd6 20.Rxd6 Bb7 21.Rhd1 Kg7 22.Rd8 Rxd8 23.Rxd8 a5 24.Kd2 b4 25.c4 a4  [Or 25...bxc3+ 26.Kxc3+-] 26.Rb8 Ba6 27.Rxb4 1-0

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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