Monday, January 30, 2017

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit Italy

Romantic chess combines beauty and sadness. We love it! This game was played in Verona, Italy, the setting for Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and Juliet”. White sacrificed a pawn to demonstrate his passion for attack. White could win, but his lovely attack died.

Enrico Danieli avoids main lines of most of the popular openings. As White, Danieli frequently has played 1.Nf3 Reti, or 1.d4 and 2.Nf3 heading toward a London System or Colle System. Once in a while he has chosen 2.Nc3. In those instances he sometimes tried a Blackmar=Diemer Gambit. Enrico Danieli played a BDG Huebsch in 2013 and a BDG Weinspach in 2015.

Eugenio Garista is a 1.e4 player as White. As Black, he counter attacks. They entered the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit Teichmann 5…Bg4. They followed a BDG popular line for a dozen moves. White obtained good chances. In my Blackmar-Diemer Theory 3 book I recommend the line 13.0-0 Qe7 14.Nxd5 cxd5 15.Rf2+/=. Danieli apparently hoped to castle queenside. He played 13.Rf1.

I just released a new book Blackmar-Diemer Puzzles. This BDG overview has 200 diagrams for you to test your knowledge and skill. The solutions are on the next page. Most positions come from games of less than 15 moves. This is a paperback version, but a kindle version is also available. Diagrams make the book more expensive and more attractive. Hope you like it. The BDG Teichmann 9.Qf3 below is section 5.4 in my Blackmar-Diemer Games 1 and Blackmar-Diemer Theory 3 books.

Danieli (2002) - Garista (2113), Verona Open 2017 Verona ITA (3.6), 03.01.2017 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 dxe4 4.f3 exf3 5.Nxf3 Bg4 6.h3 Bh5 7.g4 Bg6 8.Ne5 e6 9.Qf3 [Or 9.Bg2] 9...c6 10.g5 Nd5 11.Bd3 Nd7 12.Nxg6 hxg6 13.Rf1 Qe7 14.Bd2 0-0-0 [14...Nxc3 15.Bxc3 0-0-0 16.Qxf7 Qxg5 17.Qxe6 Bb4 18.Qxg6 Bxc3+ 19.bxc3 Qxg6 20.Bxg6 Rxh3 21.0-0-0 Rxc3 22.Rf7=] 15.Qxf7 Rxh3 [15...Nxc3 16.bxc3 Qxf7 17.Rxf7 Rxh3 18.0-0-0 Ba3+ 19.Kb1 Rdh8 20.Bxg6=] 16.Bxg6? [White has a promising attack after 16.0-0-0 Nxc3 17.Bxc3 Qxg5+ 18.Kb1 Qd5 19.Qxg6+/=] 16...Ne3 17.Bxe3 [17.Ne2 Qxf7 18.Rxf7 Rh1+ 19.Kf2 Ng4+ 20.Kg3 Rxa1 21.Kxg4 Rxa2-/+] 17...Rxe3+ 18.Kd2 [18.Kf2 Qxg5-+] 18...Qxg5 [Black also picks off a pawn with 18...Ne5 19.Qxe7 Nc4+ 20.Kc1 Bxe7 21.Rg1 Rxd4-+] 19.Qf4 Qxf4 20.Rxf4 Rg3 21.Bd3 e5 22.Rf7 [22.Re4 exd4 23.Rxd4 Rg2+ 24.Ne2 Bc5-+ and White remains down a pawn.] 22...exd4 23.Ne2 [White is down two pawns. Here's another try that would not change the outcome. 23.Ne4 Bb4+ 24.Ke2 Re3+ 25.Kf2 Ne5 26.Rxg7 Nxd3+ 27.cxd3 Rxd3-+] 23...Bb4+ 24.Kd1 Re8 25.Rf1 Rge3 26.a3 Ba5 27.b4 Bb6 28.a4 a5 29.Rb1 Kc7 30.Rf7 R8e7 31.Rf5 axb4 32.a5 Bc5 33.Rb3 Ne5 34.Nf4 Nxd3 [Or 34...g5-+] 35.Nxd3 Bd6 36.Rb1 c5 0-1


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
Copyright 2017 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
Sign Up for free weekly Chess Training Repertoire updates

Friday, January 27, 2017

French Defence My First BDG

This was my first chance at a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit as Black. Up until 1978 no one had tried to play the BDG against me. All I knew was that I didn't want to face it. When I entered a 7 player Tennessee Chess Association postal event Richard Searles as White began with 1.d4. I played 1…Nf6 to prevent him from playing 2.e4. We continued 2.Nc3 d5. I figured that d5 pawn will keep White from playing 3.e4. But Searles played 3.e4 anyway! That guy must be crazy! Or a dangerous attacker.

Let me look this up in Modern Chess Openings. There was hardly anything there. I was afraid to play 3...Nxe4 4.Nxe4 dxe4 (Huebsch Gambit). Defending my kingside without my knight seemed risky. Worse might be 3...dxe4 4.f3 exf3 (Blackmar-Diemer Gambit). I had never played against that opening in my life. Searles must know it pretty well. Yikes! I knew what to do. I transposed to a French Defence (though I'd never played it). What a fool I was! Ten years later I played the BDG and the French Defence as White all the time. Now I am comfortable in either opening. Back in 1978 I was learning.

Searles - Sawyer, corr TCA 1978 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 e6 [I was afraid to play either 3...Nxe4 4.Nxe4 dxe4 Huebsch Gambit or; 3...dxe4 4.f3 exf3 Blackmar-Diemer Gambit] 4.Bg5 Bb4 5.e5 h6 6.Be3 [Years later I often played 6.Be3.] 6...Ne4 7.Qg4 g6 8.a3 Bxc3+ 9.bxc3 c5 10.Bd3 h5 11.Qf3 Qa5!? [11...Nxc3 12.dxc5=] 12.Ne2 cxd4 13.Bxd4 Nc6 14.0-0 Nc5?! [14...0-0 15.Bxe4 dxe4 16.Qxe4+/=] 15.Qf6 Rg8 16.Be3?! [16.Rfd1+/=] 16...Nd7 17.Qg5 Ndxe5 18.Qh6 Bd7 [18...Ng4 19.Qh7 Nf6 20.Qh6 Ng4= repeats moves] 19.Rfb1 [19.h3=] 19...0-0-0 20.Rb5?! [20.h3] 20...Qa4 [20...Ng4 21.Rxa5 Nxh6=/+] 21.Rab1 b6 [21...Ng4=/+] 22.R1b3 [22.Bxb6 axb6 23.Qe3 Nxd3 24.cxd3 Kc7 25.Qxb6+ Kd6 26.Qc5+ Ke5-/+ when the Black king will hide around his kingside pawns.] 22...Nxd3 23.cxd3 Nd4 24.R5b4 Nxe2+ 25.Kf1 Qa6 [25...Qc6-/+] 26.Kxe2 Ba4 27.Rb2 b5? [Now White's attack springs to life. Better was 27...e5 28.Bxb6 e4=/+] 28.Qf4 Rd7 29.c4! dxc4 30.Rxc4+ Kd8 31.Rxa4 Qxa4 32.Qxa4 bxa4 33.Rb8+ 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
Copyright 2017 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
Sign Up for free weekly Chess Training Repertoire updates

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Blackmar-Diemer Olympiad Win

Chess Olympiads allow competition different from normal club or state tournament play. Contestants come from all parts of the world. Players bring together different styles and skill levels. Top levels grandmasters may know each other from tournament events throughout the year. Further down in the standings it’s another matter altogether. Most players are competing against complete strangers who come from other continents.

Blackmar-Diemer Zeller Gambit begins 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Bf5. BDG Accepted is 3…Nf6 4.f3 exf3. Zeller is similar to a BDG but not exactly the same if Black delays Nf6. Anthony Mongiello of the US Virgin Isles won his game against Christophe Batakafwa Biabu from the Congo in Africa. The game saw Black delay the knight until 8…Nf6.The result was not clear until White found Black’s vulnerable king and pressed the attack. The 3...Bf5 line is section 1.5 in my Blackmar-Diemer Games 2 book and in my new Blackmar-Diemer Theory 4 book.

Mongiello (1576) - Batakafwa Biabu, 42nd Olympiad 2016 Baku AZE (10.82), 12.09.2016 begins 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Bf5 4.f3 [4.g4 Bg6 5.Nge2 e5 6.dxe5 Qxd1+ 7.Nxd1 Nc6 8.Bf4 h5=; 4.Bc4 e6 5.Nge2 Nf6 6.0-0 Bd6 7.Ng3 0-0=/+] 4...exf3 [4...Nf6 transposes to the BDG Vienna Variation] 5.Nxf3 [5.Qxf3 Qc8 (5...Bxc2 6.Qxb7+/-) 6.Bc4 e6 7.Nge2 Nf6 8.d5=] 5...e6 [5...Nf6 is the BDG Gunderam Variation] 6.Bd3 Bxd3 [6...Bg6 7.Ne5=] 7.Qxd3 a6 [7...Nd7 8.Bf4 Ngf6 9.0-0-0=; 7...Nc6 8.0-0 Qd7 9.Bf4 Nge7=] 8.0-0 [8.d5!?] 8...Nf6 9.Bg5 Be7 10.Ne5 0-0 11.Ne4 [11.Rad1 Nbd7 12.Qh3 would give White an attack.] 11...Nxe4 12.Bxe7 Qxe7 13.Qxe4 c6 14.Rf3 f6 [14...Nd7=/+] 15.Raf1 [15.Rh3!=] 15...f5 16.Qe1 Nd7 17.Nd3 Qd6 18.c3 Rfe8 19.Re3 c5 20.dxc5 Nxc5 21.Nf4? [21.Nxc5 Qxc5 22.Rf2 Qb6=/+] 21...e5 [21...Rad8-+] 22.Qe2 e4 [22...b5-/+] 23.Qc4+ Kh8 24.b4 [24.Ng6+ Qxg6 25.Qxc5 Qe6 26.Qxf5 Qxa2 27.Re2=] 24...Na4 [24...Nd7-/+] 25.Qb3 Qd2? [Black missed a tactic. Better was 25...g5! 26.Nh3 Qb6 27.c4 f4 28.c5 Qg6=/+] 26.Ng6+ hxg6 27.Rh3+ Qh6 28.Rxh6+ gxh6 29.Qxa4 b5 30.Qc2 Rac8 31.Rd1 e3 32.Qe2 f4 33.Qd3 e2 34.Re1 Kh7 35.Rxe2 Rxe2 36.Qxe2 Rxc3 37.Qe7+ Kg8 38.Qe8+ Kg7 39.Qe5+ Kf7 40.Qxc3 Ke6 41.Qc6+ 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
Copyright 2017 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
Sign Up for free weekly Chess Training Repertoire updates

Monday, January 23, 2017

Dutch Defence Knight on the Rim

An old chess saying is that a knight on the rim is grim (or is dim). Things can easily go wrong with a knight on the edge. It has less scope and freedom. But it is only a maxim. You want your pieces to use the whole board if it helps. At times you can hook to the edge and then dive back toward the middle with great affect. My personal experience with the Dutch Defence Leningrad is that ...Na5 is more risky than ...Ne5. Timing is everything. Ray Haines sent me this game against Robert Bridgham. Below are some comments that Ray Haines sent me which I edited slightly.

“It was good to have Robert drive up from Bangor to play. We did not know he was coming. I played the opening good. I moved my knight to e4. I studied to game and on move 12 decided to trade my king knight for his queen knight and then move my queen knight to a5. I do not know why I ended up picking up my queen knight and not my king knight. I dropped a piece as a result. That one is not as good. I tried to make a fight out of it, but he did a good job defensing his king. He did have places where he could have gone wrong, but he did not go wrong.”

Yes Ray, I agree. White played well. As mentioned Black slipped up on move 12 and finally ran out of good moves. Maybe we will see these two play against another time.

Bridgham - Haines, Houlton Open (1), 07.01.2017 begins 1.c4 f5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 g6 4.d4 Bg7 5.g3 d6 6.Bg2 Nc6 7.0-0 0-0 8.Bg5 h6 [8...Ne4!=] 9.Bf4 [9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.Qd2=] 9...g5 10.Bc1 Ne4 [10...e5!=] 11.e3 [11.d5! Nxc3 12.bxc3 Na5 13.h4+/=] 11...e5 12.d5 Na5? [12...Nxc3 13.bxc3 Na5 14.Nd2 b6 15.e4=] 13.Nxe4 fxe4 14.Nd2 Bf5? [Black would do better to save the knight with 14...b6 15.b4 Nb7 16.Bb2 a5 17.a3+/- when White will pick up the e4 pawn.] 15.b4 c5 16.bxa5 Qxa5 17.Qc2 b5 18.cxb5 Qxb5 19.Rb1 Qe2 20.Qc4 Qh5 21.Bxe4 Bh3 22.Bg2 g4 23.Bxh3 Qxh3 24.Rb7 Rf5 25.f4 exf4 [25...gxf3 26.Rxf3 Raf8 27.Qe4+-] 26.Rxf4 Rh5 27.Qe2 Re8 28.Nc4 Rg5 [28...Be5 29.Nxe5 dxe5 30.Qc2 Qxh2+ 31.Qxh2+-] 29.Bb2 Qh5 30.Rxg7+ Rxg7 31.Bxg7 Kxg7 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
Copyright 2017 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
Sign Up for free weekly Chess Training Repertoire updates

Friday, January 20, 2017

Queens Knight vs Emil Diemer

E.J. Diemer attacked constantly from both sides of the board. Here a couple players who had survived World War II sat down to play. White might have been hoping for a quiet Queens Knight Attack. The game Hanke vs Emil Josef Diemer began 1.Nc3 d5 2.e4 d4 3.Nce2 e5 4.d3. The position was closed, but Diemer must open thing up. One can imagine a strategy of slow build up. Maybe they would engage in trench warfare more in line with World War I than II. But that did not happen. Black was a rapid tactical player.

Emil Josef Diemer attacked boldly at every opportunity. Let us consider his first eight moves in this game: 1…d5, 2…d4, 3…e5, 4…g5, 5…h5, 6…g4, 7…Qf6, and 8…Nh6. E.J. Diemer was a master of attack. Diemer is famous as White for his part in the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3. This involves a whole system of attacks after 1.d4. As Black, Diemer played many counter gambits. These included 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d5 or 2…f5 and 1.d4 e5. Often EJD won brilliantly but not today. In this game Diemer got overextended and outplayed.

Hanke - Diemer, Wangen 1950 begins 1.Nc3 d5 2.e4 d4 3.Nce2 e5 4.d3 [4.Ng3] 4...g5 [4...Bd6=] 5.Ng3 [5.Nf3 f6 6.h3 Be6 7.c3 c5 8.cxd4 cxd4 9.Ng3=] 5...h5 [5...Nc6 6.Be2 h6=] 6.Nxh5 [6.a3=] 6...g4 [Black should try 6...Bb4+! 7.Bd2 Bxd2+ 8.Kxd2 Nf6 9.Ng3 Ng4=] 7.Ng3 Qf6 8.h3 Nh6 [8...gxh3 9.Nxh3+/=] 9.Be2 gxh3 10.Nxh3 Rg8 11.Bf3 Nc6 12.Bd2 Ng4 13.Bxg4 [13.a3 Bh6 14.Bxh6 Nxh6 15.Qd2+/=] 13...Bxg4 14.Qc1 Kd7 [14...Rh8 15.a3 Qg6 16.b4 0-0-0=] 15.Ng1 [15.f3+/=] 15...a5 16.N1e2 Rh8 17.Rxh8 Qxh8 18.f3 Bxf3 [18...Be6!=] 19.gxf3 Qh2 20.c3 [20.Bg5+-] 20...Be7 21.Kd1 Qg2  [21...Rg8 22.Be1+-] 22.Kc2 Rg8 23.Qh1 Rxg3 24.Nxg3 Qxg3 25.Rg1 Qf2 26.Qg2 [26.f4 dxc3 27.bxc3+-] 26...Qxg2 27.Rxg2 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
Copyright 2016 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
Sign Up for free weekly Chess Training Repertoire updates

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Timur Gareyev Caro-Kann BDG

Grandmaster Timur Gareyev turned a Caro-Kann Defence into a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit in January 2017. For this game Timur Gareyev avoided the 4.Nxe4 main line Caro-Kann variations. The BDG is an exciting choice, but alas White walked into a bad BDG line. Better are 7.0-0, or earlier 6.Bd3, or even 3.f3!? White cannot afford to leave his king in the center. Guillermo Vazquez defended aggressively. Rather than 8…Bg6 he countered with 8…Nfd7. Black threatens Nxe5 and …Qh4+. This thematic idea comes from both Slav and other BDG variations.

Nigel Short transposed to a related line (see 7.Qe2 below) in a blitz game. Short won as White in 43 moves from a Caro-Kann Defence. The BDG seemed to fit in well with the King’s Gambits that Nigel Short played on the Internet Chess Club fifteen years ago.

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit sets up a battle of the White momentum vs the Black material. Grandmaster Gareyev (sometimes spelled "Gareev") plays a wide variety of sharp openings. At least his play is entertaining for us!

Gareyev (2617) - Vazquez (2437), PRO League Pacific 2017 chess.com INT (1), 11.01.2017 begins 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.f3 exf3 5.Nxf3 Nf6 6.Bc4 [6.Bd3!?] 6...Bf5 7.Ne5 [7.Bg5 e6 8.Nh4 Bg6 9.Nxg6 hxg6 10.Qd3 Qa5 11.h4! Nbd7 12.0-0-0 Bb4 13.Ne2 0-0-0 14.a3 Be7 15.Qh3 Nb6 16.Bd3 Qd5 17.Kb1 Kb8 18.g4 Ka8 19.Be3 Ne8 20.Qf1 Rf8 21.Nf4=; 7.Nh4 Bg6 8.Nxg6 hxg6 9.Be3 Nbd7 10.Qf3 e6=/+; 7.Bd3 Bxd3 8.Qxd3 e6 9.Bd2 Be7 10.0-0-0 0-0=/+; 7.Bf4 e6 8.Bd3 Bxd3 9.Qxd3 Bd6 10.Bxd6 Qxd6 11.0-0-0 0-0=/+; 7.Qe2 e6 8.0-0 Be7 9.Bf4 Nbd7 [Nigel Short reached this position in a blitz game from a Caro-Kann Defence. White won in 43 moves.] 10.Rae1 0-0=/+ [Short (3314) - Diana (2924), ICC 2004]] 7...e6 8.g4 Nfd7 [8...Bg6 9.h4 Bb4 10.h5 Bxc2 11.Qd2 [Diemer - Gunderam, corr 1983] 11...Rf8 12.a3 Ba5=/+] 9.Bf4?! [White's got to be feeling pretty bad about now. 9.gxf5 Qh4+ 10.Kf1 Nxe5 11.Be2 Qh3+ 12.Ke1 Ned7 13.fxe6 [Geiger - Quinones, corr 2006] 13...Qxe6=/+] 9...Nxe5 10.Bxe5 Qh4+ 11.Bg3 Qxg4 12.Be2 [12.Qd2 Be7 13.Be2 Qg5 14.Bf4 Qh4+ 15.Bg3 Qh6 16.Qxh6 gxh6 17.0-0-0 Na6 18.a3 0-0-0-/+ when Black's f-pawn is a long term advantage.] 12...Qg5 13.Rf1 Nd7 14.Bf3 Bb4 15.Qe2 Nf6 16.Qe3? Qxe3+ 0-1


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
Copyright 2017 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
Sign Up for free weekly Chess Training Repertoire updates

Monday, January 16, 2017

Grandmaster Analysis of BDG

Kevin Sheldrick contested a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit in the Australian Open against GM Adrien Demuth. This line is also a Caro-Kann Defence. Sheldrick wrote:

“I played a granddisaster with the BDG the other day. His name was Adrien Demuth and he is from France. The highlight for me was the post-mortem after the game, where I bore witness to some brilliant attacking chess moves from the friendly Egyptian GM Ahmed Adly (defending white) against Demuth's defence of black, although ultimately Adly's line appears to be unsound. All analysis below is with Stockfish, unless otherwise stated.”

Thank you Kevin! What fun it is to have grandmasters analyze your opening and your game. My Blackmar-Diemer Theory 4 book recommends 6.Nxe4 or maybe 6.Bb3 or even 5.fxe4. The line 5.Bc4 is section 3.3 in my Blackmar-Diemer Games 2 book and my new Blackmar-Diemer Theory 4 book. Below the game has notes by Kevin Sheldrick.

Sheldrick (2151) - Demuth (2521), Australian Open, 03.01.2017 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 dxe4 4.f3 c6 5.Bc4 Nbd7 6.fxe4 [6.Nxe4!?] 6...e5 [6...b5!=/+] 7.dxe5 [After the game, Adly said that after 7. dxe5, I had "no chance" and suggested 7.Nf3? exd4 8.e5!? instead but he gave up on that line, due to Demuth's response of 8...dxc3 9.exf6 gxf6!-+; Surprisingly, we all missed 7.Bxf7+!? Kxf7 8.dxe5=/+ as a possibility. (OK, it's maybe not quite as surprising that I missed it as it was that the GM's both missed it) ??.] 7...Nxe5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Bd3?! [Admittedly though, Adly also criticised 9. Bd3?! in conjunction with 7. dxe5 and I'd have been fine if I'd played 9.Bb3! instead, intending stuff like 9...Bb4 10.Nf3 Bxc3+ 11.bxc3 where I didn't realise that I would have dynamic compensation in active pieces for my shot pawn structure.] 9...Bd6 10.Bg5 Ke7?! [10...h6=/+] 11.Nf3 [11.h3!=/+] 11...h6 12.Bh4 g5 [Unfortunately I lost a lot of time around now conversing with the arbiter about suspicions over my several leavings of the playing area to go to the toilet (I drink a lot of water while playing these games in sunny Brisbane!) That loss of time made things harder for me although it's difficult to hold out against a granddisaster anyway. I took it as a compliment though that my play had been so reasonable to consider that I had been assisted by a computer up until around this point!] 13.Bf2 Nfg4 14.Bd4 Rd8 15.Ke2? [15.Be2=/+] 15...Ng6 [15...Nxd3 16.cxd3 Bxh2!-/+] 16.g3 N4e5 17.Nxe5 Nxe5 18.b3? [18.Kf2=/+] 18...Nxd3 19.cxd3 Bb4 20.Ke3 Rxd4 21.Kxd4 c5+ 22.Kc4 b5+! [Brilliant! Any other move would lose for him.] 23.Kxb5 [23.Nxb5?? Be6#] 23...Rb8+! 24.Kc6 Bxc3 [Black had a forced mate in 6 here instead - 24...Rb6+ 25.Kc7 Bxc3 26.d4 Bxd4 27.Rad1 Be5+ 28.Rd6 Bxd6+ 29.Kxc8 Rb8#] 25.Kxc5 Ba6 0-1 [26.d4 Rc8+ 27.Kd5 Bb7+ 28.Ke5 Rc5#! Notes by Kevin Sheldrick]


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
Copyright 2017 Home Page / Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
Sign Up for free weekly Chess Training Repertoire updates

Now in Kindle and paperback

Now in Kindle and paperback

Blog Archive