Friday, April 28, 2017

Richard Torning in BDG Zeller

The Blackmar-Diemer Gambit Zeller 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Bf5 is rare. The standard move is 4.f3. Some BDGers prefer 4.g4 Bg6. In Blackmar-Diemer Theory 4, I analyzed 5.Nge2, 5.Bg2, and 5.Be3 leading to equal chances. Richard Torning (AussieKiller) plays 5.Qe2 which appears once in my database. I quote his comments edited for space:

"Greetings Tim, Thank you for your Blackmar enthusiasm! I purchased Vols 1, 2, 3, and 4 on the Blackmar Gambit. The line I usually play does not appear to be mentioned in your books? Please correct me if I am wrong. Would I be so bold as to suggest that this variation be referred to as the Torning line if it is not already taken?"

"I love gambits and I coach children using miniature games. I also encourage the use of gambits in their opening repertoires. I am the current editor of the New South Wales Junior Chess Magazine. I enjoy assisting in the development of other chess coaches / administrators (emphasizing process goals as opposed to outcome goals). I am also an arbiter and chess administrator for the NSWJCL. Kindest regards, Richard Torning"

AussieKiller (1809) - smc000130 (1537), lichess.org, 02.09.2016 1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Bf5 4.g4 Bg6 5.Qe2 h5 [5...Qd7 6.Nxe4 Bxe4 7.Qxe4 c6 (7...Nc6=) 8.g5 h6 9.Bh3 e6 10.g6 f5? 11.Bxf5 Nf6 12.Qxe6+ Qxe6+ 13.Bxe6 and 1-0 in 43. Ulf Brambrink - Kuhn, Recklinghausen 2002; 5...h6 6.Qb5+ Nd7 7.Qxb7 e6 8.Bb5 Bb4? (8...Ngf6=) 9.Bxd7+! (Torning tried 9.Bd2 and won 1-0 in 24. AussieKiller - Aremando, lichess.org 2015) 9...Kxd7 10.Qxb4+-; 5...Nf6 6.Bf4 (6.g5!=) 6...e6 (6...Nc6!) 7.Qb5+ Nbd7 8.0-0-0 b6? 9.d5 a6 10.Qc6 exd5? 11.Nxd5 Be7? 12.Nxc7+ 1-0 AussieKiller - machur_leShach, lichess.org 2016; 5...Qxd4 ("Greedy grabbing a second pawn and thinking e4 is the key point for protection." Torning) 6.Qb5+ Nd7 7.Be3! Qe5 8.Qxb7 Rb8 9.Qxa7 Rxb2?! 10.Bd4! Qd6 11.0-0-0 Qb4 12.Bb5+-] 6.Bf4!? [Or 6.Qb5+ Nd7 7.g5!? e6 8.Bg2=] 6...hxg4 [6...a6 7.g5 e6 8.Bg2=] 7.0-0-0!? [7.Qb5+ Nd7 8.Qxb7=] 7...Nf6 [7...e6=/+] 8.Qb5+ c6? [8...Nbd7 9.Qxb7 Rb8 10.Qxa7 e6 11.Bxc7 Ra8 12.Bxd8 Rxa7 13.Bxf6 Nxf6 14.Bb5+ Kd8 15.Nge2=] 9.Qxb7 Nbd7 10.Qxc6 [10.d5!+-] 10...e6 [10...Rc8 11.Qa6=] 11.Nb5 [11.Ba6+/-] 11...Rc8? [11...Nd5!-/+] 12.Nc7+ Ke7 13.Bd6# 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Sicilian Like a French Defence

Mr. H. wins with his runaway h-pawn in a Sicilian Defence. White's third move 3.c3 is a surprise weapon. Black had an excellent follow-up with 3...Nf6! Ray Haines preferred the French Defence a move behind with 3...e6 4.d4 d5 5.e5. The closed nature of the position could give equal chances, but gradually White's position became somewhat better. When Black blundered on move 21, White's chances improved. However White threw the game away on move 36. Black's runaway h-pawn decided the game.

[My new French 3.Be3 Playbook is a step by step guide to the Alapin Diemer Gambit.]

matejamijuskovic - Haines, chess24, 22.04.2017 begins 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.c3 e6 [3...Nf6! 4.Be2!? e5 (4...Nxe4? 5.Qa4+ Nc6 6.Qxe4+-) 5.0-0 Be7 6.d4 exd4 7.cxd4 Nxe4 8.dxc5 Nxc5 9.Nc3 Nc6 10.Nd5 Bf6 11.Nxf6+ Qxf6 12.Be3 0-0 13.Nd4= White has compensation for the pawn sacrificed.] 4.d4 d5 [4...cxd4 5.cxd4 Nf6 6.Bd3 Be7 7.Nc3 Nc6 8.0-0 0-0 9.a3+/=] 5.e5 [5.exd5 Qxd5 6.Bd3+/=] 5...Qb6 [5...Nc6=] 6.Bd3 Ne7 7.b3 [7.0-0+/=] 7...Nd7 8.Be3 Nc6 9.Bc2 [9.0-0+/=] 9...Be7 [9...cxd4 10.cxd4 Bb4+ 11.Nbd2 Qa6=] 10.0-0 f5 11.g3 0-0 12.Qd3 cxd4 13.cxd4 Nb4 14.Qd2 Nxc2 15.Qxc2 Nb8 16.Nc3 Nc6 17.Rac1 Bd7 18.Na4 Qa5 19.Bd2 Qd8 20.Nc5 Bxc5 21.Qxc5 Qe7? [21...h6=] 22.Qxe7 Nxe7 23.Bb4 [23.Rc7!+-] 23...Rfe8 24.Rc7 Bb5? [24...Nc6 25.Rxd7+/-] 25.Rfc1 [25.Bxe7 Bxf1 26.Kxf1+-] 25...Nc6 26.Bd6 [26.Rxb7+-] 26...Be2 27.Nd2 Nxd4 28.Bc5 Nf3+ 29.Nxf3 Bxf3 30.Rxb7 a6 31.Rc3 Rec8 32.Re7 Be4 33.Rxe6 d4 34.Bxd4 Rxc3 35.Bxc3 Rc8 36.Rxa6? [36.Bd2+/-] 36...Rxc3 37.f4 Rc2 38.b4 Rg2+ 39.Kf1 Rxh2 40.Ke1 [40.b5 Rb2-/+] 40...Rb2 41.a3 Rb3 42.Kf2 Rf3+ 43.Ke2 Rxg3 44.Kd2 [44.Kf2 Rf3+ 45.Kg1 Rxf4-+] 44...Rb3 [44...h5 45.Rd6 h4-+] 45.e6 Kf8 46.Kc1 h5 47.Kd2 h4 48.Ke2 h3 [48...Bd3+! 49.Ke3 Bxa6+ 50.Kd4 h3-+] 49.Kf2 h2 0-1


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Monday, April 24, 2017

Matthias From Gambit Reversed

Thomas Matheis attempted the From Gambit reversed from a Queens Knight Attack with 1.Nc3. Jo A Wharrier responded with the Dutch Defence move 1…f5. Strong International Correspondence Chess Federation (ICCF) players generally excel in opening preparation. White could certainly have a good game with 1.d4 which transposes to the Dutch 1.d4 f5 2.Nc3 line. However White opted for a more enterprising approach.

From Gambit normally begins 1.f4 e5 2.fxe5 d6 3.exd6 Bxd6. The From Reversed gives White the extra move Nc3. The From Gambit is sound with the extra move, especially if White plays 5.Nf3. However here he chose 5.g4!? to mirror the regular From Gambit Lasker Variation 4…g5. White got into trouble with 7.Ne4?! Better would have been 7.Nge2 with equal chances. Black played well and won.

[My new French 3.Be3 Playbook is a step by step guide to the Alapin Diemer Gambit.]

Matheis (2354) - Wharrier (2341), BFCC-45 ICCF, 15.09.2007 begins 1.Nc3 f5 2.e4 fxe4 3.d3 exd3 4.Bxd3 Nf6 5.g4 [5.Nf3 e6 (5...g6 6.Bg5 Bg7 7.Qe2 Nc6 8.0-0-0 0-0 9.h4=) 6.Ng5 d5 7.Qe2 Qe7 8.0-0 Nc6 9.Re1+/=] 5...g6 [5...d5 6.g5 Ne4 7.Nxe4 dxe4 8.Bxe4 Qxd1+ 9.Kxd1 Nd7 10.Be3 e5=] 6.g5 Nh5 7.Ne4?! [More in line with the From Gambit is 7.Nge2 Bg7 8.Ng3 Nxg3 9.hxg3 d6 10.Qe2 Nc6 11.Rxh7 Bxc3+ 12.bxc3 Rxh7 13.Bxg6+ Rf7 14.Bxf7+ Kxf7 15.Qh5+ with a possible perpetual check.] 7...d5 8.Ng3 Nxg3 9.hxg3 Qd6 10.Bf4 e5 11.Qe2 Nc6 12.0-0-0 Be7 13.Be3 Nb4 14.Bc4 a5 15.c3 Qe6 16.cxb4 dxc4 17.b5 0-0 18.Rh4 Qf7 19.Qxc4 Be6 20.Qe4 Bxa2 21.Ne2 Bb3 22.Rdh1 h5 23.Nc3 Qf5 24.g4 hxg4 25.Rxg4 Kg7 26.Rf4 Qxe4 27.Rxe4 Rf5 28.Reh4 Rd8 29.Rh7+ Kf8 30.R7h6 Bxg5 31.Rxg6 Bxe3+ 32.fxe3 b6 33.Ne4 Rd7 34.Ng5 [34.Rh8+ Ke7 35.Rg7+ Rf7 36.Rxf7+ Bxf7-/+] 34...Rd3 35.e4 Rf2 36.Rc6 Rh2 37.Rf1+ Ke8 38.Rxc7 Rg2 39.Nh7 Rf2 40.Re1 a4 41.Rg1 Rdd2 42.Nf6+ Kd8 43.Rc6 Rxb2 44.Ng4 Rfc2+ 45.Rxc2 Rxc2+ 46.Kb1 Rc5 47.Kb2 Rxb5 48.Ka3 Rc5 49.Ne3 Rc3 50.Ng4 Kc7 51.Nxe5 Re3 52.Rg7+ Kd6 53.Ng4 Rxe4 54.Nf6 Re1 55.Rg4 Kc6 0-1


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Friday, April 21, 2017

Sicilian Defence vs Vestergaard

George Orwell wrote his novel “1984” a few years before I was born. It saw surveillance cameras in the future with the reminder, “Big Brother is Watching You.” I played postal chess in 1984 before the International Correspondence Chess Federation posted chess ratings. Steen Skovmose Vestergaard of Denmark had an ICCF rating of 2091 based on 582 correspondence games. His peak rating appears to have been 2349 in 2005. I have over 50 of his games in my database.

Our 1984 game was a Sicilian Defence. During the 1980s I played the Najdorf Variation in the first half of that decade. The latter half of the 1980s I played the Latvian Gambit. I played this game very well until I made a big blunder on move 23. White noticed my mistake and punished me with 24.Rxf6!

[My new French 3.Be3 Playbook is a step by step guide to the Alapin Diemer Gambit.]

Vestergaard - Sawyer, corr ICCF 1984 begins 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.f4 e6 [Another popular Najdorf approach is 6...e5 7.Nf3 Nbd7 8.a4 Be7 9.Bd3 0-0 10.0-0=] 7.Be3  [7.Be2 Be7 8.0-0 0-0 9.Be3 would be a typical Scheveningen line.] 7...b5 8.a3 [The question after 8.Bd3 b4 9.Na4!? is to the position of this knight. Is the Na4 strong or weak?; 8.Qf3 Bb7 9.Bd3 Nbd7 10.g4 leads to a sharp position.] 8...Bb7 9.Bd3 Nbd7 10.Nf3 [White retreats the knight to f3. Another idea is for the queen to occupy that square. 10.Qf3 Rc8 11.0-0 Be7 12.Rad1=] 10...Qc7 11.Qe2 Be7 12.h3 0-0 13.0-0 Nc5 14.Nd2 Rac8 15.f5 d5! 16.exd5 exd5 17.Bd4 Rfe8 18.Qf3 Nce4 19.Bxe4 dxe4 20.Qe3 Nd5 [Black may wish to sacrifice the Exchange with 20...Red8 21.Bb6 Qe5 22.Nf3 (22.Bxd8? Bc5!-+ wins the White queen.) 22...Qd6 23.Bxd8 Bxd8 24.Rad1 Bb6 25.Nd4 Rc4 26.Nce2 Rxc2=/+] 21.Nxd5 Bxd5 22.b4 [White should grab f6 while he can with 22.f6! Bc5 23.Bxc5 Qxc5 24.Qxc5 Rxc5 25.Rf5=] 22...Qxc2 [Now it is Black's turn to occupy f6 with a pawn. 22...f6! 23.c3 Qd7 24.Rae1 Bd6-/+ Black has a slightly better position due to the two bishops and advanced e-pawn.] 23.f6 Bxf6? [Big blunder. Black throws away a fine position due to White's tactical response. Better was 23...Bf8 24.fxg7 Be7=/+] 24.Rxf6! gxf6 [24...Qd3 25.Rxa6+- leaves Black down a knight.] 25.Qg3+ Kf8 26.Qd6+ Re7 27.Bxf6 Qxd2 28.Bxe7+ Ke8 29.Bh4 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Paul Keres Chigorin Defence

Paul Keres was one a handful of Twentieth Century grandmasters who was good enough to be World Champion but never made it. Others include Rubinstein, Nimzowitsch, Bronstein and Korchnoi. All were great. Paul Keres played every world champion from Capablanca to Karpov. When he was not winning, he usually held his own. Paul Keres totaled about 97 drawn games against Smyslov, Tal, Petrosian and Spassky.

Feliks Kibbermann faced his fellow countryman Paul Keres maybe 10 times over a 20 year period from the 1930s to the 1950s. In 1935 both Keres and Kibbermann represented Estonia in the Warsaw Olympiad. Early in his career Paul Keres chose the sharpest lines he could find. This worked well. Experience shows that the fastest way to improve is to learn tactics. Keres won here with what began as a Queens Knight Defence after 1.d4 Nc6. Black transposed to a wild gambit in the Chigorin 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nf3 e5!?

[My new French 3.Be3 Playbook is a step by step guide to the Alapin Diemer Gambit.]

Kibbermann - Keres, Match Tallinn (Estonia), 1935 begins 1.d4 Nc6 2.Nf3 d5 3.c4 e5!? 4.Nxe5 [4.dxe5 Nge7!? 5.cxd5 Qxd5 6.Qxd5 Nxd5 7.a3+/= and Black has an extra pawn on the queenside to compensate for White's two extra doubled e-pawns on the kingside.] 4...Nxe5 5.dxe5 d4 [Another try is 5...dxc4 6.Qxd8+ Kxd8 7.e4 Be6 8.f4 g6 9.Be3+/=] 6.e4?! [This aggressive move allows Black to equalize. 6.g3 Ne7 7.Bg2 Nc6 8.f4+/=] 6...Ne7 7.Bd3 [7.f4 Nc6=] 7...Ng6!? [7...Nc6 8.f4 Qh4+ 9.g3 Qh3=] 8.f4 Bb4+ 9.Bd2? [9.Kf2 0-0 10.a3 Be7 11.Rf1+/=] 9...Nxf4 10.Bxb4? [10.Qf3 Qh4+ 11.g3 Nxd3+ 12.Qxd3 Qe7-/+] 10...Nxg2+! 11.Kf2 Qh4+ 12.Kg1 [The point of the knight sacrifice is 12.Kxg2 Qh3+ 13.Kf2 Qe3+ 14.Kg2 Bh3#] 12...Qg5 13.Qf3 Ne1+ 14.Qg3 Qxg3+ 15.hxg3 Nxd3 16.Ba3 Nxe5 [The opening is over. Black is up two pawns.] 17.Nd2 Be6 18.b3 a5 19.Kg2 Bg4 20.Rhf1 f6 21.Rh1 Kd7 22.Bc5 Nc6 23.Nf3 b6 24.Ba3 Rae8 25.Rhe1 Bxf3+ 26.Kxf3  h5 27.Re2  [27.c5 Ne5+ 28.Kg2 bxc5 29.Bxc5 Nd3-+] 27...h4 28.c5 Ne5+ 29.Kg2 hxg3 30.Kxg3 Rh5 31.cxb6 [Or 31.Rd1 Reh8 32.Rxd4+ Ke6 33.cxb6 Rg5+ 34.Kf2 Rh2+ 35.Kf1 Rh1+ 36.Kf2 Rgg1-+] 31...Rg5+ 32.Kf2 Rh8 0-1


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Monday, April 17, 2017

Ted Bullockus Bishop Sacrifice

“Knights before bishops” is the rule of thumb for bringing out your pieces in the opening. Generally, that works well, but there are some dangers too. In the Queens Knight Attack, it can appear that White is horsing around a little too much. The game Laird vs Bullockus began 1.Nc3 e5 2.Nf3 Bc5 3.Nxe5. What can Black do? The answer is a bishop sacrifice 3…Bxf2+! 4.Kxf2 Qh4+ and the Black queen will regain the piece on e5.

In this postal game between two California players, the master Scott W. Laird has White. Dr. Theodore Bullockus was an international arbiter and longtime postal chess player. His peak ICCF rating was 2299. Ted Bullockus was a teammate of mine in the 10th Correspondence Olympiad. We represented the USA in the 1980s.

This Queens Knight Attack opening line is actually the reverse of an Alekhine Defence variation. Ted Bullockus was an expert in the Alekhine. Ted influenced me to study and play it. One Alekhine line goes 1.e4 Nf6 2.Bc4 Nxe4 3.Bxf7+ Kxf7 4.Qh5+ when White regains the piece on e4 with equal chances. The Queens Knight Attack adds 1.Nc3.

[My new French 3.Be3 Playbook is a step by step guide to the Alapin Diemer Gambit.]

Laird - Bullockus, USA corr 1980 begins 1.Nc3 e5 2.Nf3 Bc5!? 3.Nxe5 Bxf2+! [3...d6 4.Nf3+/-] 4.Kxf2 Qh4+ 5.g3 [Or 5.Kg1 Qd4+ 6.e3 Qxe5 7.d4 Qe6 8.d5 Qe5 9.d6+/-] 5...Qd4+ 6.e3 [6.Kg2 Qxe5 7.d4 Qh5 8.e4 Qxd1 9.Nxd1 Nc6 10.c3+/=] 6...Qxe5 7.Qf3 [7.d4 Qf5+ 8.Qf3 Qxf3+ 9.Kxf3+/=] 7...Nf6 8.d4 Qe7 9.e4 d6 10.h3 [10.Bg5!? Ng4+ 11.Qxg4 Bxg4 12.Bxe7 Kxe7 13.Nd5+ Kd8 14.Ne3+/=] 10...0-0 11.Bc4?! [11.Bg5+/=] 11...Nc6 12.Be3 Re8 [Here Black count equalize with 12...Be6=] 13.a3 Kh8 [13...h6 14.Bd3+/=] 14.Bd3 Be6 15.g4 [15.Rae1+/-] 15...Nd7 [15...h6 16.Rae1+/-] 16.d5 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Friday, April 14, 2017

Rare Blackmar-Diemer vs Unrug

Diemer played the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit in this little-known tournament game against Dr. Unrug at Karlsruhe in 1956. The variation in a BDG Bogo. Emil J. Diemer developed his pieces to Bg5, Bc4, and Ne5. White had a great shot with 10.Nxf7! But sadly he captured 10.Nxd7?! After that, Black got a good position, but the great gambit player kept pushing for an attack. Black missed his best chances. White got enough counterplay to draw the position.

Clarification and explanation:
This was sent by G√ľnter Brunold. After I published this blog he wrote (which I edit):
"Hello Tim! I was very pleased that you didn't forget the game. But I am bound to rectify some things:
1) Diemer's opponent was not called "Dr. Unrug" but "Dr. Unruh" (in Germany the "Unruh" in a clock is called in English the "balance wheel");
2) the game was not played in 1956 but in 1953;
3) the game did not finish in a draw. Emil Joseph (yes, with "ph"!!) Diemer ultimately won the fight.
You can read it in the Deutsche Schachzeitung 1953, p. 316: "After 19. ... Qf4, 20. d6! Qxh4, 21. Rxe4 Qf6,  22.Qxf6 exf6, 23. d7 White had a strong passed pawn warranting the draw. But black still spoilt the game in time pressure (or time trouble).""

If you like the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit, you might like some of my books:

Diemer - Dr. Unrug, Karlsruhe, 1956 began 1.d4 Nf6 2.f3 d5 3.e4 dxe4 4.Nc3 exf3 5.Nxf3 g6 6.Bg5 [6.Bc4 Bg7 7.Ne5 0-0 8.Bg5 is the most popular move order to reach the game continuation.] 6...Bg7 7.Bc4 0-0 8.Ne5 Nbd7 [Black usually plays this. The most difficult defense to meet in theory is 8...c5!-/+ ] 9.0-0 c5 [9...c6 10.Bb3 Nb6=/+] 10.Nxd7?! [Today we have the advantage of 60 years of experience watching master play and analyzing variations. Diemer had to plow virgin territory. White has a good continuation in 10.Nxf7! Rxf7 11.Bxf7+ Kxf7 12.dxc5=] 10...Bxd7 11.d5 [11.dxc5] 11...b5 12.Nxb5 Ne4 13.Bh4 Bxb5 14.Bxb5 Bxb2 15.Bc6 Rb8 16.Qe1 Bxa1 17.Qxa1 Qb6 [17...Qd6!-+] 18.c4 [18.Qe1!?] 18...Qc7 19.Re1 Qf4 [19...f5!-+] 20.d6 Qxh4 21.Rxe4 Qf6 22.Qxf6 exf6 23.d7 1/2-1/2


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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